Image

The U.S. government’s assault on press freedom

The U.S. government’s assault on press freedom

By  •  Law

Commentary
In a nation that preaches the virtues of democracy, the United States government has consistently eroded the media’s ability to report — undermining the ideals it professes to uphold. Lawyer and law professor William Bennett Turner comments in the San Francisco Chronicle.
Continue Reading The U.S. government’s assault on press freedom

Quebec courts reject businessman’s privacy claim

By  •  Law

News
The Montreal Gazette and two other Quebec media outlets won access in December 2006 to the financial information of a businessman at the centre of a major lawsuit. The Gazette‘s Mike King reports.
Continue Reading Quebec courts reject businessman’s privacy claim

Pssst … try the back door to cyberspace

By  •  Law

Feature
On the frontiers of human rights and technology, Julia Belluz writes in the Ryerson Review of Journalism, outspoken nerds fight to free the flow of information on the web.
Continue Reading Pssst … try the back door to cyberspace

Romania’s struggle with press freedom

By  •  Law

Feature
Romanian readers want their news to be fun — and soaked in scandal, Arwen Kidd reports from Bucharest in the King’s Journalism Review.
Continue Reading Romania’s struggle with press freedom

Editor of N.S. weekly demoted after advertiser complains

By  •  Law

Feature
Was John DeMings’ demotion a blow for press freedom in the town of Digby, N.S., or simply a management shuffle to improve efficiency? As Paul McLeod writes in the King’s Journalism Review, it depends who you ask.
Continue Reading Editor of N.S. weekly demoted after advertiser complains

The Asper-ization of Canadian news

By  •  Law

Feature
Despite a Senate committee’s renewed warning of the perils of media concentration, Jessica McDiarmid reports in the King’s Journalism Review, Ottawa is doing nothing to curb the loss of voices — and the threat to freedom of the press.
Continue Reading The Asper-ization of Canadian news

Copyright 101

By  •  Law

Backgrounder
You can’t print that … or can you? Copyright law gives writers and artists control over how their works and used, but there are exceptions for publishing excerpts and using material in the classroom. Find out more.
Continue Reading Copyright 101

Supreme Court upholds freelancers’ copyright

By  •  Law

News
Databases compiled by newspapers and other publishers cannot reproduce freelance work without the agreement of writers, photographers and illustrators, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in October 2006. It is a partial victory for writer Heather Robertson, who launched a class action suit in 1996 against The Globe and Mail and its then-owner – Thomson Corporation – for copyright infringement. Read the ruling.
Continue Reading Supreme Court upholds freelancers’ copyright

Alberta judge protects CBC’s sources

By  •  Law

News
An Alberta judge has refused to force the CBC to disclose documents that would identify confidential sources to Edmonton’s former chief of police, who’s suing the network for defamation over a televised report alleging he engaged in sexual relations and unlawful conduct with prostitutes. In a November 2005 ruling, Justice Vital Ouellette of Alberta’s Court of Queen’s Bench invoked journalist-source privilege to prevent the information from being disclosed at the pre-trial stage of the lawsuit.
Continue Reading Alberta judge protects CBC’s sources

Freedom of expression 101

By  •  Law

Backgrounder
Section 2(b) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects “freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication.” A primer on how the courts have interpreted these rights and what they mean for journalists.
Continue Reading Freedom of expression 101