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Reporters or deputies? Fighting back against production orders

Reporters or deputies? Fighting back against production orders

By  •  News

A ruling by the Manitoba Court of Appeal this week has some important lessons for police and the media, and the troubling tendency on the part of police agencies to use media to further their investigations.

Five years ago, police forces were given a new tool called the production order. Though it bears some similarities to a search warrant, a production order can compel someone who is not the subject of an investigation to turn over documents and video tape to the police.

When a media outlet is served with a production order, a series of important questions touching on freedom of the press are raised. These can be particularly vexing when it comes to investigative journalism, but the principles involved are important for all types of reporting.

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An archive of audio stories

If you are looking for some outstanding, award-winning radio documentaries, you might find them at this online archive from Sound Portraits.
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A guide to digital storytelling from the BBC

This is a step by step guide from the BBC about how to produce digitial stories, which it defines as “mini-movies” or “short, personal, multimedia scraps of TV that people can make for themselves.”

But even if that’s not your goal, there are good sections here on how to develop story ideas and how to gather and edit audio and video.
Continue Reading A guide to digital storytelling from the BBC

Teaching j-students to use social media

Looking for ideas about how to teach j-students to use social media in their reporting?

Here’s a list of ten ways some j-schools are doing it from Mashable.com.
Continue Reading Teaching j-students to use social media

Court rules anti-gay letter wasn’t hate speech

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Overturning a ruling by the Alberta Human Rights Commission, a Court of Queen’s Bench judge ruled last week that an anti-gay letter published in the Red Deer Advocate in 2002 was not hate speech.

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TorStar, world newspapers, wage climate-change fight

Most journalists strive never to become part of the story — except in life-or-death cases when our humanity demands action. The Toronto Star has decided that climate change is such a case — it joined 55 other newspapers around the world to demand action, not in an editorial, but in a front-page story. Excerpt:

“Today 56 newspapers in 45 countries take the unprecedented step of speaking with one voice through a common editorial. We do so because humanity faces a profound emergency.

“Unless we combine to take decisive action, climate change will ravage our planet, and with it our prosperity and security. The dangers have been becoming apparent for a generation. Now the facts have started to speak: 11 of the past 14 years have been the warmest on record, the Arctic ice-cap is melting and last year’s inflamed oil and food prices provide a foretaste of future havoc. In scientific journals the question is no longer whether humans are to blame, but how little time we have left to limit the damage. Yet so far the world’s response has been feeble and half-hearted.”
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It’s getting hotter in more ways than one…

By  •  News

Climate-Gate
has fuelled extra interest in the UN Climate
Change Conference
. Ethical journalists may hold themselves above opening
private mail, but there’s been no shortage of coverage since someone else did
the dirty work. “Does the pendulum in
the quest for ‘balance’ in covering global warming now shift back?” is one question posed in Town
Hall
.
The
Australian Science Media Centre has published a round-up of expert responses
to the hacked emails.  

Meanwhile
in
Copenhagen, journalists are lining up for a
seat in the gallery. With 5,000 credentials issued and no more room in the
venue, organizers have suspended further press registrations,
according
to UN’s Press
Information
web page.  Armchair
reporters will find the
conference’s Virtual
Participation
site helpful, including a live webcast, iPhone apps, a
Twitter feed, and other social media options.

Past
J-Source posts on climate include Investigating the
Carbon Trading Market
,
Science, hype, and
the troublesome “balance” habit
and Climate Change
Beat Guide
. There’s plenty more: just type ‘climate,’ ‘global warning’
or ‘environment’ into the J-Source search bar.

(Image by Jackl

Continue Reading It’s getting hotter in more ways than one…

Guidelines for 2010 Dart Awards anounced

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The Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma has announced a January 29th deadline for the 2010 Dart Awards for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma.

The awards “recognize newspaper, magazine, online, radio,
television, video and multimedia journalism that goes beyond the
ordinary in reporting on trauma.”

For full information, including guidelines, application forms and a listing of past winners, please check out the Dart website.
Continue Reading Guidelines for 2010 Dart Awards anounced

In Journal: Weekend papers, reporting on surveillance and assessing journalism

By  •  Research

Recent articles of interest published in scholarly journals:

Evaluating Journalism: Towards an assessment framework for the practice of journalism,” by Ivor Shapiro, Journalism Practice 4 (2), April 2010

The Globe on Saturday, The World on Sunday: Toronto weekend editions and the influence of the American Sunday paper, 1886-1895“, by Sandra Gabriele and Paul Moore, Canadian Journal of Communication, Vol 34, No 3 (2009)

CCTV surveillance and the poverty of media discourse: A content analysis of Canadian newspaper coverage“, by Josh Greenberg and Sean Hier, Canadian Journal of Communication, Vol 34, No 3 (2009)

Continue Reading In Journal: Weekend papers, reporting on surveillance and assessing journalism

Caricaturiste, un métier en évolution

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Paul Cauchon nous signale la parution d’Histoire de la caricature au Québec, un ouvrage signé Robert Aird et Mira Falardeau, qui retrace à coups de crayon inspirés l’évolution du Québec par ses personnalités marquantes. Outre les transformations de la société, on y découvre aussi ceux du métier qui se décline lui aussi, en 2009, sur le mode numérique.

À l’occasion du Congrès de la FPJQ, le journaliste du Devoir suggère d’ailleurs la création d’un prix pour la meilleure caricature. Permettez-nous d’en rajouter: un tel prix pourrait s’inspirer du palmarès mondial World Press Cartoon. Le site Web du concours rappelle l’importance du dessin d’humour comme composante essentielle d’un journal de qualité.
Continue Reading Caricaturiste, un métier en évolution