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J-Source Canadian Newsperson of the Year: Nominations open

J-Source Canadian Newsperson of the Year: Nominations open

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The Protestor may be Time magazine's choice for Newsmaker of the Year, but what about the reporters who cover the stories that make a difference? Or the editors, producers, managers and owners who make sure journalism's best are out there for Canadians. The J-Source Canadian Newsperson of 2011 award will honour a Canadian  who has demonstrated excellence and had a positive impact on the quality of journalism in their community or across the country, perhaps innovating the way news is gathered and told, inspiring journalists, educators, and the Canadian public. Who do you think we should honour this year? Send in your nominations today.

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Makin’ a list, checkin’ it twice

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Looking back on these top story predictions for 2011, there were some hits and misses. The year held some surprises, with Jack Layton topping cbc.ca’s list of most-viewed stories. The… Continue Reading Makin’ a list, checkin’ it twice

Fighting for the soul of journalism amid imposters

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As journalists, we ask tough questions of our sources. But it turns out we may need to ask such questions of fellow journalists as well. Stephen Ward writes about an alarming trend he is seeing south of the border: partisan groups passing off their work as journalism. Partisan journalism simply can’t provide the value that public journalism ideally does. The U.S. cases should serve as a warning to Canadians. Foreword by J-Source Ideas editor and Media magazine editor David McKie.

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#Twitterfight or: How journalists manage their online presence

Childish sniping, iffy ethics and the sheer lunacy of public feuds expose the human side of journalists. Is that wrong? Raeanne Quinton looked into the emerging trend of newsrooms issuing social media guidelines to reporters for the Ryerson Review of Journalism and recounts some infamous Twitter-battles between Toronto’s Jonathan Goldsbie and Sue Ann Levy.

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Statscan to make yet more data available at no cost

Statistics Canada is going to make more of its data available to the public without charge, a move that has been years in the making.

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Huffington Post Québec: le Voir s’indigne

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Le journal Voir n'en finit plus de s'indigner que plusieurs personnalités connues aient accepté de bloguer bénévolement pour le Huffington Post Québec (HPQ). Après la diffusion de deux chroniques coup de gueule de son directeur des nouveaux médias, Simon Jodoin, voilà que l'équipe publie en section «nouvelle» un texte intitulé, «Le Voir paie ses blogueurs».

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Individuals – not media organizations – led Twitter conversation in Egypt and Tunisia

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A new study released by the International Journal of Communication says that journalists, bloggers and activists were responsible for spreading more information on the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt last winter than mainstream media organizations.

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Political unrest proves deadly for journalists: CPJ report

The Committee to Protect Journalists has released the results of its annual survey of journalist fatalities worldwide. For the second straight year, Pakistan was the most dangerous place for the press, though there were also a number of new trends in 2011.

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Can the future of journalism take lessons from its past?

Things have certainly changed since the 1940s, but are there lessons to be cherry-picked from journalism of old as we move forward into new journalistic domains? Take a look at this video explaining the profession in 1940 from Encyclopedia Britannica.

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Les médias québécois boudent-ils l’information internationale?

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Par Mickaël Bergeron

Le Québécois veut que ses médias lui ressemblent parce que sinon les autres médias ne parlent jamais de ce qui se passe chez lui. La Côte-Nord n’existe pas dans les médias nationaux comme le Québec n’existe pas sur CNN, TF1, Fox News, Le Monde, etc. Ce qui est une volonté de représentativité est toutefois devenu un cercle vicieux. Un peu comme le showbusiness québécois qui a son propre «star system», l’information a fini par créer sa propre bulle.

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