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What radio reporters can teach print reporters about writing

An article from Poynter Online about how one print reporter learned to write better, tighter and shorter from following the advice of radio reporters.
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So, you want to teach journalism

This tipsheet from a journalist-turned-teacher acts as a great checklist for anyone making the transition from the newsroom to the classroom, covering everything from syllabus preparation to student management.
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Five steps to multimedia reporting

This site offers a series of tutorials for journalists who want to learn how to produce stories in the field using audio, video, photos and web design tools. The detailed instruction about shooting and editing video and audio make this site useful for broadcast instructors, too. This site is sponsored by The Western Knight Center for Specialized Journalism program, which offers workshops to mid-career journalists to enhance their expertise and multimedia skills.
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No Train No Gain: A library of resources for j-trainers

No Train, No Gain is a website initiated by a Freedom Forum report in 1993 in which newsroom trainers provide a huge range of resources for newsroom trainers which could be useful to journalism educators. The site offers training tips and handouts on everything from writing and editing, to numeracy and newsroom management.
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Online journalism awards

Each year the Online News Association and the USC Annenberg School for Communication issue awards in a wide range of categories honoring excellence in digital journalism. The link above provides a list of links to the the most recent finalists and winners. Elsewhere on the page, find links to the winners in previous years.
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Journalism education in Canada vs. the U.S.

A paper published in Journalism Studies in 2001 that argues there are striking similarities between the U.S. and Canadian systems of journalism education, as well as significant differences. Among the differences are the relatively stronger role of government in Canada; Canada’s greater emphasis on non-university education; greater curricular differentiation in U.S. programs; the type of academic unit within which journalism study is located; and the absence of a national accreditation system in Canada. The paper is written by Peter Johansen, David H. Weaver, Christopher Dornan.
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Teaching journalism via computer games

Two university professors in Minnesota are using a graphically-sophisticated computer game, produced by a Canadian gaming company, in which the students transform the medieval wizards and rogues into news editors, reporters, and other modern characters. They roleplay their way through a major news event.
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Teaching the future of journalism

“When it comes to teaching convergence, it’s no longer ‘if’ but ‘how,'” says this Online Journalism Review piece based in part on discussions at a Poynter Institute seminar. For one thing, it’s time to realize that “online video is not TV news.” For another, “multimedia storytelling” requires a new level of respect for the audience.
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The Bookshelf

The link below will take you to a page of books recommended for journalism educators, organized by subject — from teaching print, broadcast and online journalism to style guides and handbooks. The list is far from complete and we invite you to send any suggestions for books that would be of particular interest to Canadian journalism students and instructors, for us to consider adding to the list.

Photo by Stewart Butterfield, used under Creative Commons license
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The one-minute (OK maybe five-minute) editor

Some advice about how to be a good editor/teacher when you only have a few minutes, from Steve Buttry, the director of Tailored Programs at the American Press Institute.
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