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Commentary

CRTC new focus of “media democracy” movement

The CRTC has become the target of a new media democracy movement, and TorStar media columnist Antonia Zerbisias has a column
about it — and the grassroots media activists,
lawyers, academics, labour groups and cultural nationalists involved.
They want Canadians to write to the CRTC by July 18, the deadline for
its September hearings on media concentration and diversity.
Continue Reading CRTC new focus of “media democracy” movement

“A hoot”

The Washington Post’s Gene Weingarten outsources himself.
Using web resources only, he reports on some sort of Indian political
meeting with some sort of people in some sort of strange clothes, who
made lots of some sort of strange noise.

If you’re a newspaper
publisher in India he’ll sell you the rights to his story for “the
surprisingly affordable price of 80 rupees, or about two bucks.”
Continue Reading “A hoot”

Typophiles weigh in

Typophile.com has a lively discussion going on about the new Globe and Mail. Join the discussion here.
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Sensationalizing health coverage

A five-year research study at Simon
Fraser University, published this spring in an academic journal,
concludes that Canadian newspapers miss the “real stories” about health
issues and “dwell on covering the more simplistic and sensational
stories.”

Simplistic and sensational, eh. Never heard that before.

The SFU press release is here. It’s from last month but I post it here because its points are relevant to our industry.

The
study didn’t get a lot of media attention (we really don’t like
reporting on ourselves for our audience, do we) but the alternative Georgia Straight picked up
the story with a fairly thorough analysis. In her story, reporter Gail
Johnson also discussed the work of University of Victoria researcher
Alan Cassels on Media Doctor Canada, a Web site that reviews and rates news coverage on medical issues.

Continue Reading Sensationalizing health coverage