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Pickton coverage brings backlash

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Commentary
How much information about Robert Pickton’s murder trial is too much information? Tony Burman, editor in chief of CBC News, comments on the public backlash against media coverage of graphic evidence being heard in a New Westminster, B.C. courtroom.
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Adding insult to injury

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News
In many countries, it is a crime to insult public officials or any individual, group or religion. The World Press Freedom Committee has launched a campaign to eliminate this extreme form of defamation, used by many regimes to stifle press freedom. Read the committee’s press release.
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Pickton judge sets access rules

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News
The judge presiding over Robert Pickton’s murder trial has instituted a “sensible and practical protocol” to allow journalists to apply for access to exhibits. See the Vancouver Sun report.
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Mexico decriminalizes libel

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News
In a move hailed as a step toward greater press freedom, Mexican President Felipe Calder??n has approved amendments to decriminalize libel, slander and defamation. Mexico joins El Salvador as the only two Latin American nations to wipe criminal libel off the books. Read Editor & Publisher‘s April 17, 2007report.
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Blogger freed after 226 days in jail

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News
Video blogger Josh Wolf was freed on April 3, 2007after spending more time behind bars for contempt than any other American journalist in recent history. The 24-year-old, whorefused to comply with a grand jury subpoena for his testimony and video outtakes, spent 226 days in a California prison. Read the Reporter’s Committee for Freedom of the Press release.
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Landmark British privacy ruling stands

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News
Britain’s House of Lords has refused to review a landmark ruling that has been criticized for protecting privacy at the expense of free expression — and could restrict how journalists cover celebrities and public figures. The March 30, 2007 decision endorses a lower court’s finding that a former friend of Loreena McKennitt breached the Canadian singer’s privacy in a book on her private life. Read the Press Gazette report.
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News is a Conversation (Concordia)

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This Concordia journalism department is currently tackling the subject of climate change and have named their school’s blog “Tempest.”
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April 16, 2007: Event’s Annual Creative Non-Fiction Contest

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In 2007, Event is hostingits 20th Annual Creative Non-Fiction Contest, for which three winners will each receive $500 plus payment for publication in an upcoming issue of Event Magazine. Deadline for submissions is April 16.
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Cyber libel and Canada’s courts

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Analysis
Roger McConchie, a Vancouver lawyer who specializes in libel and privacy issues, has compiled detailed summaries of Canadian court rulings on Internet libel.
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Joe Howe, revisited

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Book Review
Joseph Howe, the courageous editor of the Novascotian, has long been the poster-boy for freedom of speech and freedom of the press in Canada. His exposes of government corruption in Halifax in 1835, his prosecution on a trumped-up libel charge, the eloquent six-hour speech that won his acquittal – these are the stuff of legend. In Joseph Howe & The Battle for Freedom of Speech, John Ralston Saul revisits Howe’s moment of triumph and explores the role of the media in Canada today.
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