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Politics

A PC majority in Alberta: The narrative the media missed

Surging Wildrose vs. a disenchanted PC dynasty: It was an aggressive narrative the media wanted so badly to be true that we—encouraged by dependable polls—urged it along. As Zoey Duncan reports, it wasn’t until the ballot boxes were counted that we realized how utterly we’d all been swept along by so-called opinion polls.

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A closer look at Alberta election coverage: tweeters, bloggers and mainstream context

Zoey Duncan explains that though bloggers and tweeters directed much of the coverage of the Alberta provincial election, when it came to mainstream media, amongst all the digital pageantry and Wildrose boosterism, one thing was conspicuously sparse in the coverage—context.

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Sixth down after seven months: PM’s latest communications chief resigns

By  •  Politics

    Angelo Persichilli, the latest person to run Prime Minister Stephen Harper's communications office has stepped down, telling the Globe and Mail that he "couldn't handle that kind of stress".

Continue Reading Sixth down after seven months: PM’s latest communications chief resigns

Jane Taber celebrated, leaving the Hill to head the Globe’s Atlantic bureau

After more than 20 years of reporting from Parliament Hill, Jane Taber is leaving Ottawa and heading to Halifax. The 53-year-old Globe and Mail reporter is trading in her parliamentary press pass to head up the Globe’s Atlantic bureau this January.

Continue Reading Jane Taber celebrated, leaving the Hill to head the Globe’s Atlantic bureau

Covering Ontario’s election

By  •  Politics

Toronto Star staff tackled the polling controversy, the ethics of voting, and the plethora of sports cliches in political writing at a panel at Toronto's Word on the Street. J-Source's Rhiannon Russell reports.

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Toronto Star endorses NDP; most newspapers choose Conservatives

By  •  Politics

For the second time in its history, the newspaper that sees itself as a
“small “l” liberal newspaper”
is endorsing the NDP in Monday’s
election.  Today’s editorial in the Toronto Star calls on voters to “Look to Jack Layton and
the New Democrats.” That puts the Toronto Star out in, well, left field; it seems virtually
every other daily newspaper, plus magazines such as Maclean’s and the
Economist is endorsing the Conservatives. The Globe and Mail declared: “If the result (of the campaign) is a confident new
Parliament, it could help propel Canada into a fresh period of
innovation, government reform and global ambition. Stephen Harper and
the Conservatives are best positioned to guide Canada there.”  The National Post, Montreal Gazette, Kitchener-Waterloo Record,
Hamilton Spectator,  the Sun and the Province in Vancouver, Calgary Herald, Winnipeg Free Press, Windsor Star have more or less agreed.

Continue Reading Toronto Star endorses NDP; most newspapers choose Conservatives

Reporter’s questions to Harper drowned out by partisan supporters?

By  •  Politics

More turbulent relations between journalists and Stephen Harper on the campaign trail.  A crowed of partisan supporters apparently led by Conservative staffers, created shouting chaos when CBC’s Terry Milewski pressed Harper with followup questions.

The incident, in Mississauga on Saturday, followed Milewski’s questions about the links between a man acquitted in the Air India bombing and a Conservative candidate. But Bruce Cheadle, of Canadian Press, reports: 
“A Conservative staffer near the reporter prompted the crowd of about 500 into sustained, aggressive applause that lasted more than a minute, drowning out the reporter’s repeated efforts to get a response from Harper.
The crowd eventually surged to its feet to shield the prime minister from the line of inquiry, while staffers led cheers of “Harper!””


Continue Reading Reporter’s questions to Harper drowned out by partisan supporters?

CBC Ombudsman weighs in on decision to exclude May from leaders’ debate

By  •  Politics

CBC Ombudsman Kirk LaPointe has added his voice to the Elizabeth May uproar. While LaPointe has decided not to conduct a review into the Canadian broadcast consortium’s decision to exclude the Green Party from the televised leaders’ debate, despite what he called “hundreds of complaints”, he does have a few choice words for the consortium.

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When enough is enough

Press gallery journalists across the nation are calling for an end to Harper’s history of information control. Photojournalists, documentary filmmakers and scientists are among those suffering the chill. Even the Taxpayers are ticked.        

A joint op-ed
calls on journalists to report refusals and delays as news, and editors to turn
down proffered pap. In recent weeks, enterprising journalists have dug up some
great examples of info control, reporting on heavily scripted message
streams on Afghanistan
, including crafted quotes for returning aid workers.

For your viewing pleasure, examples of the now-infamous Message Event Proposals are posted here. Anna Maria Tremonti’s ‘request count‘ is still ticking – to date, The Current has bagged six interviews with federal politicians, and 43 refusals. When the Tyee’s reporter was barred from an event, he made it a story.

Back in 2007, Sharda Vaidyanath predicted an upside to a worsening relationship, leading to more enterprising reporting.

So far, though, the government response is clear: “Let them eat lakes!”
Continue Reading When enough is enough

Political standoff in Ottawa presents opportunity for journalism online

The political standoff in Ottawa created an unprecedented
opportunity for journalism online. The volume of commentary demonstrates how this publishing format can engage
audiences in a way that is not only good for journalism, but good for democracy.
Continue Reading Political standoff in Ottawa presents opportunity for journalism online