It's true: The way journalism and journalists interact with social media is rapidly evolving. So if you think you’ve got a handle on how to use each platform to enhance your journalism, you might want to re-think that with Facebook’s much-hyped upcoming IPO. At least one journalist is, anyway.

It's true: The way in which journalism and journalists interact with social media is rapidly evolving. So if you think you’ve got a handle on how to use each platform to enhance your journalism, you might want to re-think that with Facebook’s much-hyped upcoming IPO. At least one journalist is, anyway.

Kristie Lu Stout, an anchor/correspondent for CNN International in Hong Kong, wrote this piece on CNN.com that says “Now that Facebook is friends with Wall Street, this journalist is giving her timeline a rethink.”

She continues, questioning whether Facebook is really essential for journalists. After all, other social media networks each have a niche for her – Twitter for breaking news, Google+ for conversation. But for her? Facebook is for “personal branding” and engagement – not journalism.

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With Facebooks IPO comes the expectation that it will make money quarter after quarter. Stout says this is where the problem lies for journalists:

And here's where it cuts to the heart of my profession. Journalists have been flocking to Facebook to create content and connections on a platform that the company can use for all time.

Not only that, we're feeding an advertising rival that's only going to get bigger after Friday's IPO.

Make sure you read Stout’s entire piece – she goes into far more detail on what Facebook's IPO means for news and advertising.

What do you think? Will Facebook’s IPO change the way journalists and news organizations use Facebook? Should it?