Mon, 11/24/2014 - 17:24

Posted by Belinda Alzner on September 20, 2012

 

In Canadian media:

National Post’s Bruce Arthur named best sports writer in Canada

Bruce Arthur, the National Post’s sports columnist, is the recipient of the George Gross Media Award for excellence in sports writing for 2012. Past recipients of the award, which has been given out since 2000, include Randy Starkman, Cam Cole and Stephen Brunt.

CBSC: Negative comments about Haitians violated broadcast code

The Canadian Broadcast Standards Council has ruled that negative comments that radio hosts on Le Show Tard on CHOI-FM Radio X 98.1 in Quebec City made in April about Haitian people had violated its Code of Ethics and Equitable Portrayal Code.

Ottawa Citizen’s Matthew Pearson wins literacy fellowship

The Ottawa Citizen’s education reporter Matthew Pearson has won a fellowship from ABC Life Literacy Canada to investigate programs aimed at arming adults with better literacy skills in order to re-enter the workforce.

[node:ad]

 

In international media:

New BBC chief: Time to re-invent content

In his first day on the job, George Entwhistle told BBC staff that the time of re-purposing content for various mediums had come to an end. Now, he says, it’s time to create content based on the notion it will be used for interactive platforms. In a speech that stressed the importance of creativity, the new BBC boss hinted that a genre-based approach might be the best way forward.

 

Today’s read:

Ford ally says mayor needs to be better at separating personal and political

As part of a story by The Globe and Mail’s Kelly Grant and Elizabeth Church that showed Mayor Rob Ford had made a special request to get a road outside his family business fixed before an anniversary event, an ally of his on council said the mayor needed to be better at separating personal and political matters. Denzil Minnan-Wong, chair of the public works committee, said that while the mayor was not given any special treatment in this case, Ford needs to be more careful, as recent events have put him under increased scrutiny.  

J-Source and ProjetJ are publications of the Canadian Journalism Project, a venture among post-secondary journalism schools and programs across Canada, led by Ryerson University, Université Laval and Carleton University and supported by a group of donors.