Feature
The Web 2.0 movement ushered in an interactive Internet and put power in the hands of the people, tapping the so-called wisdom of the crowds to change the world — and to keep such a digital democracy in check. A decade later, as defamation lawsuits mount in response to an explosion of vicious attacks and anonymous gossip, some are questioning the wisdom of the crowds — and wondering if it hasn’t turned into mob rule. Deborah Gage reports in the San Francisco Chronicle.

Feature
The Web 2.0 movement ushered in an interactive Internet and put power in the hands of the people, tapping the so-called wisdom of the crowds to change the world — and to keep such a digital democracy in check. A decade later, as defamation lawsuits mount in response to an explosion of vicious attacks and anonymous gossip, some are questioning the wisdom of the crowds — and wondering if it hasn’t turned into mob rule. Deborah Gage reports in the San Francisco Chronicle.

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