Student Lounge

Jun 25, 2013 - Posted by Eric Mark Do

Someone asked me if I had any guidelines for how I use Twitter, and I thought I could think of maybe five things that I believe to be true I’ve been on it for a few years now, and have made lots of mistakes. I’ve been boring, I’ve been funny, I’ve been not funny when I thought I was being funny, I’ve been argumentative, I’ve shared too much information, I’ve killed Gordon Lightfoot. When I sat down to write down what I thought, I came up with more than I expected. So, here are my personal guidelines on how to use Twitter as a beat reporter. I often forget to follow many of them.

Nov 09, 2012 - Posted by Eric Mark Do

Using audio to tell a story is a great device for journalists. Here are some ways to use SoundCloud to do that and more.

Sep 09, 2010 - Posted by Melissa Wilson - Students' Lounge Editor

Here's a great jumping-off point for working journalists, teachers, students or anyone who wants to build a library of excellent journalism manuals and reference books. This list includes books on topics ranging from ethics to investigative reporting to online journalism, as well as some recommended stylebooks and grammar manuals. 

Feb 01, 2010 - Posted by Melissa Wilson - Students' Lounge Editor
A listing of the major journalism awards offered around the world.
Dec 14, 2009 - Posted by Melissa Wilson - Students' Lounge Editor
It’s getting to be that time of year again. Yes, put away those twinkle lights and nicely wrapped presents because interview season is just around the corner, and you’ll want to nail it. 
Dec 02, 2009 - Posted by Melissa Wilson - Students' Lounge Editor
The difference between its (possessive) and it’s (contraction) is grammar 101. It’s child's play. It's the ham sandwich of gourmet grammar. And yet it is one of the most common grammar errors, if not the most common error, out there in the world of very smart and savvy journalism students (and, don't be fooled, professional journalists). But don’t feel too bad—there may be a reason why this particular mistake is plaguing your writing.
Dec 01, 2009 - Posted by Melissa Wilson - Students' Lounge Editor
Does anyone really know the difference between who and whom? It seems these poor words have gotten a bad rap for being the most confusing and most misused pair of words in the world of grammar. Luckily, there are a couple of tricks to help you remember which is which.
Nov 27, 2009 - Posted by Melissa Wilson - Students' Lounge Editor
In the slippery world of “affect versus effect” many default to the “affect is a verb and effect is a noun” thought process. But both words can be used as both noun and verb, which makes choosing the right word in this manner a matter of gut-feeling guesswork. This dilemma is explained well in a blog post from PoynterOnline.
Nov 15, 2009 - Posted by Melissa Wilson - Students' Lounge Editor
The apostrophe is a tricky devil, arguably the trickiest bit of punctuation the English language offers. If you find yourself constantly second-guessing whether “its” or “it’s” is the correct word, you’re not alone. But fear not: the funny folks at The Oatmeal have made a handy chart that should dispel the confusion.
Nov 03, 2009 - Posted by Melissa Wilson - Students' Lounge Editor
The web is taking over, no doubt, but it's important to not put all your eggs in that basket and retain and hone some of the core journalistic skills you're already learning in j-school, writes Ryan Sholin on his blog, Invisible Inkling.
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