Law

Oct 30, 2011 - Posted by Dean Jobb

A Toronto Star investigation into the city’s busy youth court met with resistance from judges and prosecutors, arbitrary publication bans and attempts to block access to the basic records the media needs to cover the justice system. In the words of reporter David Bruser, the paper had to fight to lift the “institutional shroud covering the often-disturbing details of youth crimes from public view.”Read the Star’s Oct. 29 report: “A Secret Court.”

 

Sep 27, 2007 - Posted by Dean Jobb
News
Toronto (June 28, 2007) -- A judge has ruled that Toronto author and journalist Derek Finkle does not have to turn over research materials accumulated in writing No Claim To Mercy, his book about the Robert Baltovich murder case. Police subpoeaned Finkle's notes and interview transcripts in October 2006; Finkle, backed by several writers's groups, challenged the order, arguing it threatened press freedom in Canada.
Read the judge's ruling.
Read the Canadian Journalists for Free Expression press release.
PEN Canada comments on the subpoena.
See the Professional Writers Association of Canada release.
Sep 26, 2007 - Posted by Dean Jobb
Feature
Globe and Mail justice reporter Kirk Makin likens maintaining a beat to tending a garden. “There’s only a certain period where there’s fruit in the trees,” he says, “but you have to do a whole lot of gardening in between.” Beat reporting remains the lifeblood of newspapers. So why is the Globe clogging its arteries with marquee columnists, a glut of Ottawa coverage and so much “news you can use”? Julia LeConte of the Ryerson Review of Journalism investigates.
Dec 26, 2006 - Posted by Dean Jobb
Commentary
Canadian news outlets, however unknowingly, helped smear Maher Arar's reputation. The editor-in-chief of CBC News says the case highlights why journalists should be wary of using anonymous sources. By Tony Burman. Posted Oct. 3, 2006.
Oct 23, 2006 - Posted by Dean Jobb
Feature
How three investigative reporters -- Stevie Cameron, Andrew McIntosh, and Juliet O'Neill -- got so close to the story that they became the story. Read Elysse Zarek's report in the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
Oct 23, 2006 - Posted by Dean Jobb
Feature
In the wake of allegations against investigative reporter Stevie Cameron, journalists find themselves wondering where they stand on giving the police information. As Sam Mednick writes in the King's Journalism Review, a former Halifax reporter says a meeting with the military police caused him more problems than he could have ever foreseen.
Oct 23, 2006 - Posted by Dean Jobb
Feature
Nick Pron is convinced he's found the balance between being too friendly with the cops and too critical of them. Judging by the number of cops and journalists who no longer speak to him, he's succeeded. Wendy Glauser reports in the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
Oct 22, 2006 - Posted by Dean Jobb
Commentary
A legal precedent on the disclosure of evidence means what a journalist tells the police or other investigators could wind up as Exhibit A in court. A word to the wise – remember, anything you say or do could be used against you. By Dean Jobb.
Oct 22, 2006 - Posted by Dean Jobb
Feature
Crown attorneys’ media rules walk the line between informing the public and preserving the right to fair trial. So what can prosecutors tell journalists – and the public – about court cases? By Dean Jobb.
Syndicate content

      

   

source