Ward's Words

Nov 14, 2013 - Posted by Tamara Baluja

For some time, journalists and their associations have been trying anxiously to define “journalist” and “journalism” as a media revolution blurs the differences between professional journalists and citizens. But as Stephen Ward writes in his latest column, discussing what is good journalism is the most important issue, not squabbling over a definition of journalist.

Oct 21, 2013 - Posted by Bruce Gillespie

In journalism, transparency is fashionable. Journalists who reject objectivity say: “I am biased but I am honest and transparent." But hyping transparency distorts media ethics in several ways; it wrongly implies that transparency can replace other principles and can resolve ethical issues created by new media, writes Stephen Ward.

Jun 28, 2013 - Posted by Eric Mark Do

New codes will need to recognize that activist journalism in its many forms will continue to be one of the many ways to use media. But, when are journalists ‘agenda-driven activists’ and when are they ‘investigative journalists with a valid cause’? Stephen J. A. Ward with the latest in Ward's Words.

Dec 13, 2012 - Posted by David McKie

Impartiality and objectivity as bloodless norms is an absurd caricature, argues Stephen J.A. Ward in the latest issue of Media magazine, with an intro from editor David McKie

May 09, 2012 - Posted by Belinda Alzner

The current changes in journalism have brought many new ethical challenges, but they’re also changing the idea of ethics itself, according to Stephen J. A. Ward

Sep 13, 2011 - Posted by Lauren McKeon

No one likes covering a suicide. The publicity may add pain at a time of grieving, and can, experts fear, push other suicidal people over the age. But for Stephen J. A. Ward, the question is how -- not whether -- painful facts should be reported.

Aug 03, 2011 - Posted by Lauren McKeon

In today's rapidly changing media environment, many journalism schools are getting creative when it comes to teaching journalism -- and no subject is more tricky than ethics. J-Source contributing editor Stephen J.A. Ward asks: Whither objectivity? This article originally appeared on PBS MediaShift.

Feb 15, 2011 - Posted by Dana Lacey
Stephen J.A. WardJournalists who add their own fierce opinions to political discourse have every right to do so, writes Stephen J.A. Ward, but it's "deliberative" commentators who serve a democracy best.
Dec 14, 2010 - Posted by Dana Lacey
Stephen WardLast week, two prominent US columnists called for the death of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. This knee-jerk patriotism -- that loving your country means not embarrassing your government -- undermines the power of a free press, Stephen J.A. Ward writes. But for some journalists, "national security" trumps independent reporting.
Sep 21, 2010 - Posted by Dana Lacey
Stephen WardThe question “Should the media cover a little-known pastor’s Koran-burning plan?” has been widely debated. Stephen J.A. Ward asks a larger question: "How is news selected?" He offers guidelines to help editors respond responsibly to a Terry Jones and a soon-to-follow host of copycats. 
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Ward's Words

Journalism ethics column by Stephen J.A. Ward, incoming director at the George S. Turnbull Center, the Portland base of the University of Oregon's School of Journalism and Communication.

      

   

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