Image

Posts By Alan Bass

Latest Posts | By Alan Bass

Social media now a key info source for journalists

By  •  Research

Social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook are commonly used by journalists as sources of information, according to a survey by Cision and George Washington University. More than half (56 per cent) of 371 respondents said social media was important or somewhat important for researching and producing stories. Although Google (100 per cent), corporate websites (96 per cent) and weblogs (89 per cent) are still used most often for online research, 65 per cent also reported using social networking sites such as Facebook while 58 per cent said they use photo/video sharing sites like Flickr and YouTube and 52 per cent used microblogging sites such as Twitter. Wikipedia is also popular, used by 61 per cent as a research source. 
Continue Reading Social media now a key info source for journalists

Facebook sends more people to news sites than Google News

By  •  Research

News organization that haven’t yet incorporated Facebook into their news distribution strategy might want to change course, and soon. According to research from Hitwise, Facebook is now the fourth-ranked source of visits to news and media sites, behind Google, Yahoo and MSN. Facebook overtook Google News as a source of news site visits last year and is miles ahead of Google Reader. Some are already speculating that Facebook is on its way to becoming the web’s top news reader.
Continue Reading Facebook sends more people to news sites than Google News

Don’t write about me just because I’m disabled

By  •  News

When reporters can’t see past a person’s disability, Lisa Coriale writes, they can miss the real story. There’s more than one storyline to report about people with disabilities.
Continue Reading Don’t write about me just because I’m disabled

Haitian earthquake: Its not about you, Dr. Gupta

By  •  News

Journalists were among the first outsiders to rush to the scene of the earthquake in Haiti. While most have described the devastation and challenges confronting survivors with professionalism and humanity, Jeff Sallot writes, some are using the assignment to promote their own celebrity.
Continue Reading Haitian earthquake: Its not about you, Dr. Gupta

Study examines how ads impact credibility of news

By  •  Research

An editorial study conducted by the Seattle Times looked at how contextual advertising (affinity to content determines ad placement) impacted readers’ perceptions of online news content. It found most readers were comfortable with contextual ads in sections focused on softer news – like sports, travel and entertainment – but were not happy to see them next to hard news stories about “serious” issues.
Continue Reading Study examines how ads impact credibility of news

Future of media studypalooza

By  •  Research

As part of a newly launched study into the future of media, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission has posted a lengthy, hyperlinked collection of recent studies and articles on media’s future from a wide range of (American) sources.
Continue Reading Future of media studypalooza

Almost half of Google News readers don’t visit originating news sites

By  •  Research

Complaints by media proprietors like Rupert Murdoch that Google News is “stealing” their content has always been countered by the argument that Google and other news aggregators actually direct web traffic back to orignating news sites. However, a survey of news consumers by Outsell Inc. found 44 per cent of Google News visitors scan headlines without ever clicking through to read more. Here’s the conundrum: The same survey predicted “a rude awakening” for news organizations that try to protect their content behind paywalls because so many respondents rejected the idea of paying to access news.
Continue Reading Almost half of Google News readers don’t visit originating news sites

Reporting on abuse in the Church should look beyond victims and bureaucrats

By  •  News

There’s more to the story of sexual abuse by clerics than victims, abusers and self-protecting bureaucracies, writes Joyce Smith. Part of the challenge of reporting on religion is recognizing the spiritual element in the story and following the impact of events on relationships and faith.
Continue Reading Reporting on abuse in the Church should look beyond victims and bureaucrats

Bad news for online user-pay advocates

By  •  Research

An ITZ/Belden Interactive study of reader sign-up rates at 26 U.S. dailies that put their online versions behind a paywall found the average number of online subscribers amounted to just 2.4 per cent of print subscribers, Alan Mutter reports on his Reflections of a Newsosaur blog.

Continue Reading Bad news for online user-pay advocates

New media mostly reproduces old media’s news: Pew

By  •  Research

Although the Internet has spawned a vast increase in news sources, almost all news is still gathered by traditional media, suggests a study by the Pew Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. The study, which tracked how news was gathered and circulated through more than 53 news outlets during a week last year in Baltimore, discovered 95 per cent of new information was published by traditional media – particularly general newspapers, specialty newspapers and local television – and their websites. Across all outlets, however, more than 80 per cent of “news” was previously published information. Meanwhile, the number of stories published by the city daily declined 32 per cent from 1999 and more than 60 per cent of information found in news stories was initiated by government officials, particularly police.
Continue Reading New media mostly reproduces old media’s news: Pew

UA-56626905-1