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Posts By Cecil Rosner

Latest Posts | By Cecil Rosner

Hacker-assisted reporting: can it be ethical?

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We have all heard about computer-assisted reporting. Can hacker-assisted reporting be the next great tool for the investigative journalist?

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Exposing dirty media tricks: “It helps that Murdoch is a bastard”

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The phone hacking scandal at News of the World might never have been fully exposed without the dogged efforts of Guardian reporter Nick Davies. Davies, a colourful character who pulls no punches, described how he got the story in an address to the recent Global Investigative Journalism Conference.

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Working with WikiLeaks: the rewards and the frustrations

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J-Source's Investigative Journalism editor Cecil Rosner brings us a special dispatch from the Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Kiev: What it was like for the investigative journalists who worked with Julian Assange, and why one will never do it again.

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From the workshop to the real world: teaching investigative journalism

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One way to measure the success of any university program is to look at the real world output of the students.When it comes to investigative journalism, the students at King’s College in Halifax deserve high marks.
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Investing in investigative work

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“Where the marketplace is unable to serve, that’s the role of public media,” PBS president Paula Kerger said last year.

It appears PBS and NPR are putting that motto into action. This article from the Huffington Post provides details of recent investments into the kind of journalism that is shrinking in for-profit American outlets.
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When investigative journalism turns into breaking news

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What happens when a long-term investigation suddenly turns into breaking news?

It’s something investigative journalists need to be ready to deal with at a moment’s notice.
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Secrets, strategies and whistleblowers

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Anyone who has produced an investigative report, especially one that involves whistleblower allegations, knows there are some common strategies when it comes to fighting back.

It’s useful to examine some of those strategies, against the backdrop of the current debate about the Wikileaks revelations.

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Predictions for investigative reporting in 2011

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Here is an interesting collection of insights into future directions of investigative reporting, albeit from an American perspective.
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Essential reading for journalists

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Dean Jobb’s newly-revised book on media law is an invaluable tool for every investigative reporter,  and indeed for anyone practising journalism in Canada.

Jobb, of course, is editor of the law section on J-Source, and associate professor at King’s College School of Journalism in
Halifax. He has specialized in covering and studying the courts and
legal issues. The second edition of Media Law for Canadian Journalists
covers all the essential legal topics journalists need to know.

Keeping
up with all the new decisions and nuances of media law can be a
full-time job. But the author carefully tracks the developments and puts
them into context for reporters. From using Twitter inside a courtroom
to avoiding defamatory remarks on Facebook,  Jobb also provides
useful advice on handling social media tools in a legally responsible
manner.

Because Jobb has extensive reporting experience, he has a
good appreciation of the often blurry boundaries between ethics, law and
good taste. His book has a separate chapter on ethics and professional
responsibility, and he isn’t afraid to offer his opinion on the
propriety of different types of reporting.

This is an important
book, and whether you’re a professional journalist or an occasional
blogger, you won’t regret getting a copy. It is published by Emond Montgomery Publications.
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Exoneration 101

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When you’re investigating potential wrongful convictions, a variety of skills are necessary — some journalistic, some legal. That’s why a new partnership between journalism and law students at UBC makes perfectly good sense. Cecil Rosner reports.

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