A new media journalism professor in the U.S. has decided to ban laptops in some of his media classes. 
Jeremy Littau says he loves technology, but the evidence is building that student test scores improve in classes where laptops are banned. He is also concerned about what he calls "the halo effect."

"When a student has a laptop open, invariably the cone of people next to and behind that student get caught up watching as well. The movie playing or the Facebook page on the screen can be a huge distraction to both those students and to me."

He outlines his new "soft ban" on his blog. Other J-profs may find his thoughtful arguments and approach worth following.

A new media journalism professor in the U.S. has decided to ban laptops in some of his media classes. 
Jeremy Littau says he loves technology, but the evidence is building that student test scores improve in classes where laptops are banned. He is also concerned about what he calls "the halo effect."

"When a student has a laptop open, invariably the cone of people next to and behind that student get caught up watching as well. The movie playing or the Facebook page on the screen can be a huge distraction to both those students and to me."

He outlines his new "soft ban" on his blog. Other J-profs may find his thoughtful arguments and approach worth following.

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