Dean Starkman offers some strong opinions on the sell-out of the WSJ in the Columbia Journalism Review, and a warning for the NY Times. An excerpt:

And so Dow Jones & Co., once the proud lion of financial news, goes down instead like a jackrabbit shot while sprinting across a field, tumbling just long enough to hold a discussion about tradition, responsibility, ethics, Schumpeter and other conservative-sounding things, before finally coming to rest, belly up.

After the deal was announced, the WSJ’s editorial page went on the offensive, or tried to, against anyone who might suggest that Dow Jones’s sale might not be as good a deal for business-press readers as it is for top DJ executives and senior Journal editors.

Dean Starkman offers some strong opinions on the sell-out of the WSJ in the Columbia Journalism Review, and a warning for the NY Times. An excerpt:

And so Dow Jones & Co., once the proud lion of financial news, goes down instead like a jackrabbit shot while sprinting across a field, tumbling just long enough to hold a discussion about tradition, responsibility, ethics, Schumpeter and other conservative-sounding things, before finally coming to rest, belly up.

After the deal was announced, the WSJ’s editorial page went on the offensive, or tried to, against anyone who might suggest that Dow Jones’s sale might not be as good a deal for business-press readers as it is for top DJ executives and senior Journal editors.

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