In an essay in the Toronto Star, David Eaves and Taylor Owen explore the impact of blogging, which they contend reaches its 10th anniversary this month.

“Blogging continues to be misunderstood by both technophiles and technophobes,” they argue, and say blogs will neither replace traditional journalism nor threaten the quality and integrity of journalism – or democracy.

Eaves and Owen say that instead of being a substitute blogs, like books, are symbiotic with journalism, “to the benefit of everyone.”

“Ultimately blogs, like books, don’t replace journalism; they simply provide another medium for its dissemination and consumption,” the pair argue. “If anything, it has made journalism more accurate, democratic and widely read.”


In an essay in the Toronto Star, David Eaves and Taylor Owen explore the impact of blogging, which they contend reaches its 10th anniversary this month.

“Blogging continues to be misunderstood by both technophiles and technophobes,” they argue, and say blogs will neither replace traditional journalism nor threaten the quality and integrity of journalism – or democracy.

Eaves and Owen say that instead of being a substitute blogs, like books, are symbiotic with journalism, “to the benefit of everyone.”

“Ultimately blogs, like books, don’t replace journalism; they simply provide another medium for its dissemination and consumption,” the pair argue. “If anything, it has made journalism more accurate, democratic and widely read.”

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