By now, most of us have probably read Kai Nagata's manifesto against mainstream TV news — "Why I quit my job". We've also probably read (and perhaps contributed to) the dozens of comments praising and slamming the 24-year-old. Indeed, as Joëlle Pouliot writes in The Gazette, one group has been strangely silent: other journalists in their 20s.

By now, most of us have probably read Kai Nagata's manifesto against mainstream TV news — "Why I quit my job". We've also probably read (and perhaps contributed to) the dozens of comments praising and slamming the 24-year-old. Indeed, as Joëlle Pouliot writes in The Gazette, only one group has been strangely silent: other journalists in their 20s.

"Perhaps it was due to fear of damaging their career debut," Pouliot, an intern at The Gazette, writes, "While Nagata is off to whatever his next venture might be, referring to himself as a 'freelance human' on Twitter, many new journalismschool graduates are just entering the news jungle and struggling to survive in it."

And some of those journalists feel Nagata has hurt the reputation of many twenty-something journalists.

One CBC intern put it to Pouliot like this:

"In a way, he hurt the credibility of young journalists — because who really wants to hire a 24-year-old now, if they appear so flighty and are prepared to quit on a whim?"

In other words, writes Pouliot, "he makes us 'kids' look cocky and ungrateful."

What else did young journalists have to say about Nagata's screed? Read the rest here.

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