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In Journal: Weekend papers, reporting on surveillance and assessing journalism

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Recent articles of interest published in scholarly journals:

Evaluating Journalism: Towards an assessment framework for the practice of journalism,” by Ivor Shapiro, Journalism Practice 4 (2), April 2010

The Globe on Saturday, The World on Sunday: Toronto weekend editions and the influence of the American Sunday paper, 1886-1895“, by Sandra Gabriele and Paul Moore, Canadian Journal of Communication, Vol 34, No 3 (2009)

CCTV surveillance and the poverty of media discourse: A content analysis of Canadian newspaper coverage“, by Josh Greenberg and Sean Hier, Canadian Journal of Communication, Vol 34, No 3 (2009)

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Consumers willing, not, to pay for online news

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With ad revenues slumping and web readership growing, news industry leaders are again mulling over making people pay to read online news. Two consulting companies recently released results of their own studies into consumer preparedness to pay for news and the results are … inconlusive. The Boston Consulting Group polled more than 5,000 people in nine countries and concluded many consumers would pay a few dollars a month to access local, specialized and breaking news on devices of their choice. Forrester Research, on the other hand, polled more than 4,700 Americans and concluded 80 per cent would not pay for online news.
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Bold advice for news orgs: Follow customers before money

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News organizations that wait for online revenue to increase before reallocating major resources from traditional products to online products are making a huge and possibly terminal mistake, according to a research paper presented to a conference on the future of journalism hosted by the Yale Law School.

News consumers are shifting their attention to online products much faster than ad spending, but the money will catch up, the study argues. “All of which suggests that if traditional news organizations are to ‘survive’ and eventually thrive in this digital age, they need to radically change course and transform their century-old business model, following much of the same game plan used by … niche information providers – of shedding legacy costs as quickly as feasible, while simultaneously and aggressively re-building community and revenue online.”
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In Journal: The remaking of newswork

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In a special issue, Journalism examines how transformations in the media business are impacting working conditions and labour practices in the journalism workplace. Articles include:

“Compressed dimensions in digital media occupations: Journalists in transformation,” by Amy Schmitz Weiss and Vanessa de Macedo Higgins Joyce

“Token responses to gendered newsrooms: Factors in the career-related decisions of female newspaper sports journalists,” by Marie Hardin and Erin Whiteside

“The performative journalist: Job satisfaction, temporary workers and American television news,” by Kathleen M. Ryan

“Structure, agency, and change in an American newsroom”, by David M. Ryfe

“Watchdog or witness? The emerging forms and practices of videojournalism,” by Sue Wallace

“The shaping of an online feature journalist,” by Steen Steensen

“Between tradition and change: A review of recent research on online news production,” by Eugenia Mitchelstein and Pablo J. Boczkowski

For a full list of articles with abstracts, please click on ‘More’.


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Public supports watchdog press: Pew

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Although recent Pew surveys in the United States have documented a serious decline in the public’s perception of news media’s performance in areas like accuracy and neutrality, the role played by the press in monitoring and criticizing government and politicians continues to be regarded as a valuable and important public service.
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It’s the content, stupid!

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Despite the surging popularity of social media sites, content-oriented sites are by far the biggest attraction online, according to figures compiled by the Online Publishers Association. In fact, the number of people attracted to content sites and the amount of time they spend there are growing. So far, it appears the dramatic growth in popularity of social media is happening at the expense of older online communication tools such as e-mail and instant messaging. The findings suggest news media organizations should avoid enhancing their social media capabilities by cannibalizing resources used to generate original content.
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New site focuses on sports journalism

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The National Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University has just launched sportsjournalism.org, a website devoted to the subject of sports journalism and sports media.
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Pew survey: U.S. media credibility at all-time low

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The latest Pew survey into the credibility of U.S. news media paints a bleak picture, with the news media’s reputation reaching or matching all-time lows for accuracy, neutrality, independence and willingness to admit mistakes. Also notable is the pervasive partisan divide between how Republicans and Democrats view specific news organizations.
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U.S. media advertising revenue plummets $10 billion in six months

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U.S. media companies suffered a devastating decline in advertising revenue during the first six months of this year, according to a Nielsen report. Biggest losers included the newspaper and magazine sectors. Gainers included infomercials and smartphone ads.
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Two-thirds of Twitter users younger than 25

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Some other findings from a study by social media marketing firm Sysomos:

  • More than 85 per cent of users rarely post (less than once a day)
  • About five per cent of users account for 75 per cent of content
  • Only six per cent of users have more than 100 followers.

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