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Sports gambling common among sports reporters

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About 40 per cent of sports reporters gamble on sports, even though many admit it undermines their ability to report objectively, according to a survey of sports reporters conducted by the John Curley Center for Sports Journalism at Penn State University. The survey results were published in the most recent issue of the International Journal of Sports Communication.
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In Journal: Trauma, democracy, foreign ownership and war

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Articles published in the most recent issue of the Canadian Journal of Media Studies that may be of interest to the journalism community:

“Informed Mutual Support: Options on Violence and Trauma from the Perspective of the Journalist”, by Robert M. Frank and Ross Perigoe

“Covering Democracy: The coverage of FPTP vs. MMP in the Ontario Referendum on Electoral Reform”, by George Hoff

“Thwarting Foreign Ownership Limits: Policy Activism by CanWest Global Communications in Canada and Australia”, by Marc Edge

“Media, Politics and the Emergence of Democracy in Bangladesh”, by Abul Mansur Ahmed

“News of War in a Distant Land: The News Media and the Korean War”, by Andrew Fraser

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People hardwired toward local and negative news

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Well, waddaya know? Journalism’s traditional and much-criticized tendency to attract readers by emphasing negativity and localism appears to have measurable, scientific merit. According to a study from the University of Missouri School of Journalism that measured physiological responses to different types of health stories, people are biologically hardwired to pay attention to news that’s close to home and potentially threatening.

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In Journal: Media depictions of Bosnian war babies, UK politics, mental health and criminal behaviour

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Articles recently published in academic journals that may be of interest to the journalism community:

“A Fresh Crop of Human Misery’: Representations of Bosnian ‘War Babies’ in the Global Print Media, 1991—2006”, by R. Charli Carpenter, Millennium – Journal of International Studies, Vol. 38, No. 1, 2009

“U.K. Television News: Monopoly Politics and Cynical Populism”, by Mike Wayne and Craig Murray, Television & New Media, Vol. 10, No. 5, 2009

“What Are The Top-Circulating Magazines in the United States Telling Older Adults About Cognitive Health?”, by Anna E. Mathews, Sarah B. Laditka, James N. Laditka and Daniela B. Friedman, American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2009

“Naming, shaming and criminal justice: Mass-mediated humiliation as entertainment and punishment”, by Steven A. Kohm, Crime, Media, Culture, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2009

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Continue Reading In Journal: Media depictions of Bosnian war babies, UK politics, mental health and criminal behaviour

Study of online news distribution underway

“The OECD is conducting a study on the Future of News to which this discussion session contributes. Independent journalism and newspapers play an indispensable role in informing citizens. Yet currently the newsgathering and distribution
process is undergoing deep changes. In OECD countries both the number
of physical newspaper titles, their circulation and newspaper
readership are in steady decline. Newspaper bankruptcies and layoffs
have increased. At the same time, it has never been easier, quicker and
cheaper to access news. Readers now also actively participate in the
news creation, editing and dissemination process.”
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Teen media usage not so different, study argues

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For many in the traditional media business, attracting young readers and viewers is like searching for the Holy Grail, a quest that never quite succeeds as hoped. However, according to How Teens Use Media, a new “myth-debunking” study by the Nielsen company, teens really aren’t that different from other people in how they interact with mass media. 

“The fact is, teens are unique, but they are not as bizarre and outlying as some might presume. Sure, they are the digital natives, super-communicators and multi-taskers we hear so much about, but they are also the TV viewers, newspaper readers and radio listeners that some assume they are not. What we have found, across a variety of studies, is that teens embrace new media not at the cost of traditional media, but in supplement to it. Taken on whole, teens exhibit media habits that are more similar to the total population than not.”
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In Journal: Online stories often unedited and selling news with slogans

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Selected stories from the most recent issue of the Newspaper Research Journal that may be of interest to the journalism community:

Copy Editing Not Great Priority for Online Stories, by John Russial 

An Analysis of Slogans Used to ‘Sell the News’, by Salma Ghanem and Kimberly Selber 

Newspaper Managers Report Positive Attitudes about Blogs, by Brad Schultz and Mary Lou Sheffer 

How to Report Quantitative Information in News Stories, by Coy Callison, Rhonda Gibson and Dolf Zillmann 

Benefits Dominate Coverage of Vision Corrective Surgery, by Seok Kang 

Rating Citizen Journalists Versus Pros: Editors’ Views, by Seungahn Nah and Deborah Chung 

Papers Endorse Republicans in Nearly 60 Percent of Races, by Mark D. Ludwig

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Most Canadians think tweeting is for birds

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Twitter may be a hot subject in many newsrooms, but in the real world … not so much. A recent survey of Canadians by Ipsos-Reid found just 26 per cent of respondents had ever heard of Twitter and only a teeny-tweety-tiny 1.45 per cent actually use it. Said a polling company spokesman: “The buzz (to) usage ratio is sort of out of whack right now.”
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News media pigged out on these ‘junk food’ stories

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The folks at Project Censored, who usually decry serious issues underplayed by mainstream media, have just released a top-ten list of “junk food stories” served and served again by the press during the past two years. See how many you gobbled up … 

1.Olympic Medalist Michael Phelps Hits a Bong
2. Jessica Simpson Gains Weight
3. First Lady Michelle Obama’s Fashion Sense
4. The Brangelina Twins
5. Lindsay Lohan Dating a Woman
6. The Presidential First Puppy
7. Heidi Montag “Marries” Spencer Pratt
8. Barry Bonds Steroid Trial
9. Jamie-Lynn Spears Gives Birth
10. The Woes of Amy Winehouse
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In Journal: Journalistic truth, the limits of competition and covering the 2008 presidential campaign

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Selected articles from the June 2009 issue of Journalism Studies that may be of interest to the journalism community:

Claiming Journalistic Truth, by Burton St. John

Is More Always Better?, by Lee Becker, Ann C. Hollifield, Adam Jacobsson, Eva-Maria Jacobsson and Tudor Vlad

Changing and Staying the Same: Communication in Campaign 2008, by Lynda Lee Kaid

Strategies for Autonomy, by Noha Mellor

Investigative Journalism in China Today, by Jingrong Tong and Colin Sparks

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