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Just when you thought dead-tree newspapers were just plain dead …

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Some young people who wouldn’t be caught dead reading a newspaper today expect they will in the future. That’s what doctoral student Seth C. Lewis found when he surveyed students at two U.S. universities. While only 14 per cent of the more than 1,200 students surveyed would openly admit to reading a non-student print product today, 41 per cent said they expected to be newspaper readers five years from now. However, just to put things in perspective, 71 per cent said they expected to be reading online news sites five years from now, compared to the 58 per cent who read online news today. The research was published in the latest issue of Newspaper Research Journal.

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In Journal: Examining journalism in Brazil

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The February 2009 issue of Journalism focuses exclusively on journalism in Brazil. Articles include:

Journalistic thinking: Brazil’s modern tradition, by José Marques de Melo

Journalists and intellectuals in the origins of the Brazilian press (1808-22), by Heci Regina Candiani

The past and the future of Brazilian television news, by Beatriz Becker and Celeste González de Bustamante

Cultural journalism in Brazil: Academic research, visibility, mediation and news values, by Cida Golin and Everton Cardoso 

Notes on media, journalism education and news organizations in Brazil, by Sonia Virgínia Moreira and Carla Leal Rodrigues Helal

Journalism in the age of the information society, technological convergence, and editorial segmentation: Preliminary observations, by Francisco José Castilhos Karam

Please click on ‘More’ to read article abstracts.
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Newspaper websites attracting more readers: Nielsen

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The number of unique monthly visitors to the top 10 U.S. newspaper websites has increased an average of 16 per cent since 2007, Nielsen Online reports, while total visits are up by 27 per cent, suggesting readers are also visiting more often. It’s more evidence that news consumption is shifting online and the challenge facing newspapers is how to shift more of their total revenue generation online as well.
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What’s Happening to the News (in Britain)?

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News in Britian is increasingly being produced by “digitally mechanized factories” devoted more to continuously processing content than to generating original news, according to “What’s Happening to Our News”, a study published by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. The result is a news agenda driven by pre-packaged PR products and “the ephemeral trails of the global clickstream.” To preserve the economic viability and civic purpose of news and journalism, the report calls on Britons to consider introducing reforms such as tax incentives to encourage private companies to support journalism and aid the creation of philanthropic news-funding models. Although self-regulation of the news industry is perferable to government regulation, the report states, society needs government to play an active role in safeguarding journalism. The report should be of interest to the Canadian journalism community. Although discussions about journalism in Canada often reflect American ideas and events, our system of government and our mixed economy have more in common with Britain.

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In Journal: Nieman Reports on the future of news

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Nieman Reports, a journal that publishes articles about journalism and news media written by journalists, devotes the lion’s share of its current issue to journalism’s  future. Articles are organized under the headings “Spiking the Newspaper to Follow the Digital Road”, “Grabbing Readers Attention – Youthful Perspectives”, “Blogs, Wikis, Social Media – And Journalism” and “Rethinking the What, When, Why, Where and How of What We Do”.
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In Journal: Hostility to media, challenging authority, self-censorship and youth

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Titles and brief abstracts (for abstracts, click on ‘more’) of some recent journal articles of possible interest to the journalism community:

Elaboration of the Hostile Media Phenomenon: The Roles of Involvement, Media Skepticism, Congruency of Perceived Media Influence, and Perceived Opinion Climate, by Jounghwa Choi. Hallym University; Myengja Yang, KT Corporation and Jeongheon JC Chang, Michigan State University. From: Communications Research, Vol. 36, No. 1, Feb. 2009

Professionalism Online: How Malaysiakini Challenges Authoritarianism, by Janet Steele, George Washington University, Washington D.C. From: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Vol. 14, No. 1, Jan. 2009

Organizational Production of Self-Censorship in the Hong Kong Media, by Francis L.F. Lee, School of Journalism and Communication, Chinese University of Hong Kong and Joseph Chan, School of Journalism and Communication, Chinese University of Hong Kong, School of Journalism, Fudan University, China. From: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Vol. 14, No. 1, Jan. 2009

The Causes of Youths’ Low News Consumption and Strategies for Making Youths Happy News Consumers, by Edgar Huang, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. From: Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, Vol. 15, No. 1, Feb. 2009

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Women in journalism by numbers

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If you’re looking for a source of statistical data about women in journalism, check out the research compendium page of the McCormick Foundation New Media Women Entrepreneurs website.

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More people spend a lot of time on the Internet

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Almost half of U.S. adults now spend more than an hour a day using the Internet, according to a Gallup survey. Frequent Internet use surged during the past year among some demographic groups, particularly men, post-graduates, people aged 18-29, seniors, unmarried people, single people and the unemployed. However, frequent Internet use slipped slighlty for some cohorts, including college graduates, people aged 30-49 and high-income earners.

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Internet overtakes newspapers as news source; TV next?

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The Internet surpassed newspapers as a source of national and international news for the first time in 2008, according to a new Pew Research Centre survey. Forty per cent of respondents said they got most of their national and international news from the Internet, while only 35 per cent cited newspapers. Television continues to outclass both, with 70 per cent (the survey allows for multiple choices) selecting TV as their main source of national and international news. However, the survey includes data that suggests the days of TV’s dominance may be numbered – the Internet tied TV as the primary news source among people aged 18-29. The survey was conducted in the United States in early December.



Source: Pew Research Centre

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Newspapers: Bad now, but worse to come

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The outlook for newspapers in 2009 is exceptionally bleak, according to a Kubas Consulting survey of more than 400 Canadian and U.S. newspaper executives and managers. The revenue outlook for next year is described as “terrible,” particularly for classified advertising. The only ad sector in which managers expect revenue to increase is online; however, as the study’s authors note, online ads account for a fraction of total revenue. Also, recent quarterly numbers suggest the online sector may peform more poorly than hoped, especially for newspapers, where online ad sales are often tied to print sales through incentive packages. The survey found Canadian managers, about 17 per cent of respondents, were a little less pessimistic than Americans, reflecting a slightly stronger confidence in the Canadian economy’s prospects for next year.
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