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Online journalists fear Internet eroding professional values

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Journalists who work online are worried the Internet is undermining journalism’s professional values, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism. A slight majority of respondents believed journalism is on the “wrong track,” with many citing declining journalistic standards as their main concern. However, the study notes, online journalists are more optimistic about the future than those who work in print.
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Magazine readership slips slightly

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Readership of Canadian magazines is down less than three per cent since last year, according to figures released by the Print Measurement Bureau. Reader’s Digest has the largest readership and CAA Magazine has the largest circulation.

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Canadian newspaper readership ‘stable’

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Readership of Canadian newspapers remains strong despite the financial problems plaguing the industry, according to figures released today by NADbank. Almost half of Canadian adults read a newspaper on an average weekday and weekly readership of newspapers in large markets has changed little during the past five years, the newspaper research organization reported. Meanwhile, the Canadian Circulation Audit Board also released circulation data for its member papers. Several daily newspapers recently stopped having their circulation audited by the Audit Bureau of Circulation and moved to the CCAB, which previously audited mainly community newspaper circulation.

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News economic trends in two graphs

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Two graphs included in the 2009 State of the Media report published by the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism show at a glance why some sectors of the news business are in desperate straits. One shows 2007-2008 advertising revenue trends; the other shows audience trends for the same period. Newspapers in particular are suffering a double whammy – print revenues are falling faster than readership while advertising growth online is lagging far behind the surge in readers.
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Newspapers won’t be missed: Pew poll

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If newspapers are dying, here’s why: A lot of people don’t care. That message comes through loud and clear in a recent poll conducted by Pew Research. Asked if they’d miss their local paper if it had to shut down, only 33 per cent of respondents said they’d miss it a lot. Forty-two per cent said “not much” or “not at all.”
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Media Cloud: Automated media research tool open for testing

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Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society is beta testing an open-source, automated online media research tool called Media Cloud. According to the Center, Media Cloud software can already code full-text content from an extensive range of traditional and new media outlets, including blogs, and issue comparative reports about news subjects, terminology correlations and geographic story sourcing. Creators hope it will eventually be able to accept a variety of research questions and output results in several formats, including graphs and maps. So far, publications included in the database are mostly American but creators say Canadian news sources like CBC and the Globe and Mail will soon be added. It’s worth checking out.
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Public believes newspapers still relevant but doubt they’ll survive

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A large majority – 82.8 per cent – of Americans believe newspapers are still relevant but far fewer – 45.5 per cent – believe they’ll still exist in 10 years, according to a survey conducted by New York PR firm The Rosen Group. More than 29 per cent of survey respondents declared “websites devoted to news reporting” to be their “most indispensible news source,” compared to 18.1 per cent who cited print newspapers and 16.3 per cent who prefered online newspapers.
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Strategies for overcoming “Assignment Stress Injury”

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Patrice KeatsNewsroom culture discourages journalists who cover traumatic events from seeking help for fear of being stigmatized as weak and unprofessional, writes counselling psychology professor Patrice Keats. Keats found those affected clearly want and need more help from employers and peers.
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Newspapers losing print readers faster than they gain readers online

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It’s well known newspapers are losing advertising dollars from print operations faster than revenue is growing at their online operations. It turns out the same thing is happening to readers, according to a study by the the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. If newspapers can’t change this trend, there is little chance they’ll ever build online revenues to a level approximating the golden days of print.

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Search term trends reflect economic worries

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Internet searches using terms like “unemployment benefits”, “bankruptcy” and “foreclosure” have leaped dramatically in frequency during the past year, according to an analysis by comScore Inc. Call it a digital sign of the times.

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