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Law

The thin blue line

By  •  Law

Feature
Nick Pron is convinced he’s found the balance between being too friendly with the cops and too critical of them. Judging by the number of cops and journalists who no longer speak to him, he’s succeeded. Wendy Glauser reports in the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
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Paper-thin protection

By  •  Law

Feature
The law offers little protection for journalists who want to keep sources confidential. But as Carly Baxter reports in the Ryerson Review of Journalism, there are some things you can do – and you should know.
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Shooting the messenger

By  •  Law

Feature
Worried about press freedoms in Canada? Try reporting the news in Zimbabwe, says Aaron Leaf in the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
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Copywrong

By  •  Law

Feature
Who holds the right to secondary publication of articles stored in an online database — the publisher or the author? Adrienne Macintosh explores the issue in the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
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Protecting sources 101

By  •  Law

Backgrounder
A Canadian court is unlikely to recognize a journalist’s right to protect the identity of a confidential source. So how should journalists deal with sources who ask for anonymity?
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Lifting the lid off search warrants

By  •  Law

Feature
Search warrant files contain a wealth of information about police investigations and allegations of wrongdoing. While warrants are often sealed in high-profile cases, media organizations are winning court battles to bring their contents to light. By Dean Jobb.
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Reporting on the Justice System

By  •  Law

This section contains information, advice and commentary on legal issues that arise when covering court cases, trials and hearings.
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Beware of police officers asking questions

By  •  Law

Commentary
A legal precedent on the disclosure of evidence means what a journalist tells the police or other investigators could wind up as Exhibit A in court. A word to the wise – remember, anything you say or do could be used against you. By Dean Jobb.
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Prosecutors in the spotlight

By  •  Law

Feature
Crown attorneys’ media rules walk the line between informing the public and preserving the right to fair trial. So what can prosecutors tell journalists – and the public – about court cases? By Dean Jobb.
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Levelling with our sources

By  •  Law

Commentary
The contempt conviction of Hamilton Spectator reporter Ken Peters for refusing to name a source shows the wisdom of devising an exit strategy before making a promise of confidentiality. By Dean Jobb.
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