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Ontario Ministry of Attorney General reviewing media access to criminal courts

By  •  Law

Toronto Star investigation found Ontario courts are increasingly denying access to criminal records that legal experts say should be accessible to the media.

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Trespass charge against Star reporter dropped

By  •  Law

Trespassing charges against Alex Consiglio, the Toronto Star reporter arrested in June after photographing a scuffle on a platform at Toronto Union Station, have been dropped, the Star reported Friday.
 

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What j-students need to know about protecting anonymous sources

By  •  Law

The courts’ inconsistency on the question of anonymous sources, coupled with the absence of so-called shield laws in Canada, raises the question of whether a journalist should ever grant source anonymity, writes J-Source’s law editor Thomas Rose.

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Live blog: Everything you need to know about court reporting in real-time

By  •  Law

Is reporting on court cases in real-time in the public interest, or does it have the potential to do more harm than good? How does adding a real-time element change the role of a court reporter? What are the legal limitations around reporting directly from inside the courtroom? Regardless of how you slice it, court reporting is complicated – but especially so in real-time. For this week's Scribble Chat, we'll be tackling these issues and more. Will we conclude the whole damn system's out of order? Join the discussion to find out.

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David Skok on Nelson Mandela and the importance of press freedom

By  •  Law

David Skok reflects on Nelson Mandela's impact on him, and on press freedom around the world. 

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Did journalists violate rights of B.C. terror suspects?

By  •  Law

Allegations that two Canadian citizens planned to explode homemade devices similar to the kind used in the Boston marathon bombing during Canada Day celebrations at the B.C. legislature in Victoria is shocking.  Does that justify the actions of journalists who entered the apartment of the two suspects this week, rummaged through their private belongings, took photographs of those belongings and subsequently splashed some of those photos on the front pages of such news outlets across the country?  Law Editor Thomas Rose has more on the legal and ethical dimensions of such behaviour. 

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Toronto Star reporter arrested after photographing Union Station scuffle

By  •  Law

Toronto police arrested a Toronto Star reporter, put him in a headlock and handcuffed him for taking pictures after a GO Transit officer was injured in a scuffle at Union Station, the Star reports. Canadian Journalists for Free Expression is calling for an investigation.

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Why hasn’t Mayor Rob Ford sued the Toronto Star?

By  •  Law

Its been a week since the Toronto Star and Gawker went public with allegations concerning Mayor Rob  Ford mixing with self identified criminals and possibly smoking crack cocaine.  The mayor has denied the allegations dismissing them as part of a larger vendetta against him.  Given the seriousness of the allegations and the damage they are doing to the office of mayor as well as to Ford himself, why hasn't he filed a libel suit?  J-Source Law Editor Thomas Rose explains. 

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Commentary: What does the twitter ban in Quebec courtrooms mean for freedom of expression?

By  •  Law

Quebec is the latest jurisdiction to issue a protocol on the use of electronic devices by reporters and lawyers inside a courtroom, sparking some heated but predictable responses.  Is this a violation of a citizen's right to stay informed?  Does it impinge freedom of expression?  Does it tarnish the principle of a fair and open trial?

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Ban on Twitter in Quebec courtrooms goes in effect today

By  •  Law

As of Monday, no one will be able to email, tweet or text from inside Quebec courtrooms without the consent of the judge. The move runs contrary to recent changes made in Ontario, B.C., Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador, where the courts sanctioned the use of electronic devices by lawyers and journalists during court proceedings.

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