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News

Trial by journalist

By  •  Law

Feature
In Canada, you’re innocent until proven guilty. You wouldn’t know it from reading some of Christie Blatchford’s columns on high-profile trials. Mike Drach of the Ryerson Review of Journalism explains how one journalist has pushed the limits of the law of contempt of court.
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Media access to court exhibits

By  •  Law

Analysis
Recent court rulings should give journalists better access to documents, photographs, videotapes and other evidence presented as exhibits in court cases. By David Crerar and Majda Dabaghi
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When the police come calling

By  •  Law

Feature
In the wake of allegations against investigative reporter Stevie Cameron, journalists find themselves wondering where they stand on giving the police information. As Sam Mednick writes in the King’s Journalism Review, a former Halifax reporter says a meeting with the military police caused him more problems than he could have ever foreseen.
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The thin blue line

By  •  Law

Feature
Nick Pron is convinced he’s found the balance between being too friendly with the cops and too critical of them. Judging by the number of cops and journalists who no longer speak to him, he’s succeeded. Wendy Glauser reports in the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
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Paper-thin protection

By  •  Law

Feature
The law offers little protection for journalists who want to keep sources confidential. But as Carly Baxter reports in the Ryerson Review of Journalism, there are some things you can do – and you should know.
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Shooting the messenger

By  •  Law

Feature
Worried about press freedoms in Canada? Try reporting the news in Zimbabwe, says Aaron Leaf in the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
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Copywrong

By  •  Law

Feature
Who holds the right to secondary publication of articles stored in an online database — the publisher or the author? Adrienne Macintosh explores the issue in the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
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Internet libel threat transcends time, space

By  •  Law

Analysis
The Internet’s immediacy and global reach means reputations can be ruined with the click of a mouse. The courts have just begun to grapple with allegations of defamation on the Internet, but it’s clear publishers and writers risk being sued in faraway countries. And each “hit” to access archived material could be considered re-publication of a libel, extending the risk of a lawsuit far into the future. By David Crerar.
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The legal watchdogs

By  •  Law

Feature
As John Jaffey of the Ryerson Review of Journalism discovered, it takes a special breed of lawyer to deliver us from libel.
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Gotcha!

By  •  Law

Feature
Police have more power over reporters than most of us realize. Whatcha gonna do when they come for your notes or tapes? Jay Somerset investigates for the Ryerson Review of Journalism.
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