The Centre for International Media Assistance, based in the U.S., has released a report on citizen journalism. This is how it describes its purpose:
“This paper examines both the opportunities and challenges facing citizen journalism in foreign lands, focusing especially on the so-called purple (not free) and yellow (partly free) zones, as defined by the Freedom House Foundation’s Map of Press Freedom 2010, which ranks 196 countries and territories. In many such places, the definition between citizen journalism and advocacy blurs, and traditional newsroom standards are a luxury if not entirely irrelevant. So any discussion of citizen journalism in countries where the press is partly free or not free cannot be separated from the governmental environment and atmosphere that limit its practice.”

The Centre for International Media Assistance, based in the U.S., has released a report on citizen journalism. This is how it describes its purpose:
“This paper examines both the opportunities and challenges facing citizen journalism in foreign lands, focusing especially on the so-called purple (not free) and yellow (partly free) zones, as defined by the Freedom House Foundation’s Map of Press Freedom 2010, which ranks 196 countries and territories. In many such places, the definition between citizen journalism and advocacy blurs, and traditional newsroom standards are a luxury if not entirely irrelevant. So any discussion of citizen journalism in countries where the press is partly free or not free cannot be separated from the governmental environment and atmosphere that limit its practice.”

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