Critics of a New York Times investigative story about a CIA interrogator, whom it named, say it “has made him a marked man.” Scott Shane, the reporter, and his editors said that using the name was necessary for credibility.

The Times’ Public Editor Clark Hoyt weighs the issues, and concludes:

“I understand how readers can think that if there is any risk at all, a person like Martinez should never be identified. But going in that direction, especially in this age of increasing government secrecy, would leave news organizations hobbled when trying to tell the public about some of the government’s most important and controversial actions.”

Critics of a New York Times investigative story about a CIA interrogator, whom it named, say it “has made him a marked man.” Scott Shane, the reporter, and his editors said that using the name was necessary for credibility.

The Times’ Public Editor Clark Hoyt weighs the issues, and concludes:

“I understand how readers can think that if there is any risk at all, a person like Martinez should never be identified. But going in that direction, especially in this age of increasing government secrecy, would leave news organizations hobbled when trying to tell the public about some of the government’s most important and controversial actions.”

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