Many magazines exempt their own websites from the editorial standards applied to their traditional print product, reports a study of editorial practices at 665 magazines by the Columbia Journalism Review. The study found 11 per cent do not copy edit web-only content at all while 48 per cent copy edit it less rigorously than print material. Fact checking was also applied less  rigorously for online-only content by 27 per cent of the magazines studied, while 8 per cent didn’t fact check web content and 8 per cent didn’t fact check web or print material. The study also states that 45 per cent of magazine web sites make factual corrections without alerting readers.

Many magazines exempt their own websites from the editorial standards applied to their traditional print product, reports a study of editorial practices at 665 magazines by the Columbia Journalism Review. The study found 11 per cent do not copy edit web-only content at all while 48 per cent copy edit it less rigorously than print material. Fact checking was also applied less  rigorously for online-only content by 27 per cent of the magazines studied, while 8 per cent didn’t fact check web content and 8 per cent didn’t fact check web or print material. The study also states that 45 per cent of magazine web sites make factual corrections without alerting readers.

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