“Women have made huge advances in TV sports broadcasting over the past 10 years,” writes William Houston in a Globe and Mail critique of women’s role in sports broadcasting. “There are more working in the business. They hold jobs as reporters, anchors and, in the United States, even play-by-play announcers.”

“But as the numbers have grown, the importance of their physical appearance has increased. More than ever, networks place an emphasis on youth and beauty, and, by no surprise, Playboy is now publishing an annual list of the sexiest sportscasters. Within that environment, women continue to struggle for credibility as sports journalists.”

I’d like to turn that question around, and ask if rampant sexism is just another reason that sports “journalism” is struggling for credibility.

“Women have made huge advances in TV sports broadcasting over the past 10 years,” writes William Houston in a Globe and Mail critique of women’s role in sports broadcasting. “There are more working in the business. They hold jobs as reporters, anchors and, in the United States, even play-by-play announcers.”

“But as the numbers have grown, the importance of their physical appearance has increased. More than ever, networks place an emphasis on youth and beauty, and, by no surprise, Playboy is now publishing an annual list of the sexiest sportscasters. Within that environment, women continue to struggle for credibility as sports journalists.”

I’d like to turn that question around, and ask if rampant sexism is just another reason that sports “journalism” is struggling for credibility.

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