Some young people who wouldn’t be caught dead reading a newspaper today expect they will in the future. That’s what doctoral student Seth C. Lewis found when he surveyed students at two U.S. universities. While only 14 per cent of the more than 1,200 students surveyed would openly admit to reading a non-student print product today, 41 per cent said they expected to be newspaper readers five years from now. However, just to put things in perspective, 71 per cent said they expected to be reading online news sites five years from now, compared to the 58 per cent who read online news today. The research was published in the latest issue of Newspaper Research Journal.

Some young people who wouldn’t be caught dead reading a newspaper today expect they will in the future. That’s what doctoral student Seth C. Lewis found when he surveyed students at two U.S. universities. While only 14 per cent of the more than 1,200 students surveyed would openly admit to reading a non-student print product today, 41 per cent said they expected to be newspaper readers five years from now. However, just to put things in perspective, 71 per cent said they expected to be reading online news sites five years from now, compared to the 58 per cent who read online news today. The research was published in the latest issue of Newspaper Research Journal.

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