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Lite rock versus local culture

By  •  13 years ago  •  News

Citizens of Gabriola
Island
want a community radio station,
so they can hear local culture on the air and have the benefit of emergency
broadcasting. Rogers Communications wants them to step aside for lite rock
programming from Victoria, and has
decided to speak
against the islanders’ CRTC application
.

This brings to mind the work of community radio stations
around the world. Twenty-five years ago The
World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters (AMARC)
started as a
small meeting of volunteer radio enthusiasts in Montreal.
Today the association has a worldwide membership of more than 3,000 stations
dedicated to the democratization of communications, as described in The Kathmandu
Declaration
.

It’s widely accepted that community radio serves to promote
local cultures and languages
before they are lost. But beyond culture,
there are lives at stake, according to this article from India
on the 2004 tsunami, which argues hundreds
of lives could have been saved by community radio
. The Indian government has
since responded with funds
and frequency allocation for community radio
.  

On a daily basis, AMARC members fight for the
broadcast rights of small stations, from Senegal
to the
Jordan Valley
. Perhaps they’ll need to add Gabriola to their list – because it’s doubtful lite rock will
be much help when the waters rise, or even when you just want to hear your
neighbour’s latest song.


Citizens of Gabriola
Island
want a community radio station,
so they can hear local culture on the air and have the benefit of emergency
broadcasting. Rogers Communications wants them to step aside for lite rock
programming from Victoria, and has
decided to speak
against the islanders’ CRTC application
.

This brings to mind the work of community radio stations
around the world. Twenty-five years ago The
World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters (AMARC)
started as a
small meeting of volunteer radio enthusiasts in Montreal.
Today the association has a worldwide membership of more than 3,000 stations
dedicated to the democratization of communications, as described in The Kathmandu
Declaration
.

It’s widely accepted that community radio serves to promote
local cultures and languages
before they are lost. But beyond culture,
there are lives at stake, according to this article from India
on the 2004 tsunami, which argues hundreds
of lives could have been saved by community radio
. The Indian government has
since responded with funds
and frequency allocation for community radio
.  

On a daily basis, AMARC members fight for the
broadcast rights of small stations, from Senegal
to the
Jordan Valley
. Perhaps they’ll need to add Gabriola to their list – because it’s doubtful lite rock will
be much help when the waters rise, or even when you just want to hear your
neighbour’s latest song.

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Patricia W. Elliott is a magazine journalist and assistant professor at the School of Journalism, University of Regina. You can visit her at patriciaelliott.ca.

Comments
  1. Auntie Wahr

    Many of us know about David
    Many of us know about David and Goliath. The story whether real or not is an example of the disparity of size between players and that a well placed shot will bring down the biggest. The problem with BIG is that it isn’t limited to big radio, or big TV, it includes big banks, big government, big religion, and big corporations. Which big do you want to turn around and make it a dig… as in a grave? Each BIG has a point on which they can be attacked. They look to support themselves with other bigs… and bigots. Every one has a point where they are vulnerable. It isn’t necessarily the same point, however one stands out. They don’t like being identified as being against the little guy in public. They don’t like to have their advertisers turn on them either.

    When will we learn that we the many are big, no, bigger? What manner of campaign do we need to run together to show the bigs who oppose us and try to oppress us that they aren’t nearly as big as we are?

  2. Frank Moher

    The CRTC has now closed
    The CRTC has now closed Gabriola Radio’s file.

  3. Ken Zakreski

    Sept 2009- Gabriola Radio
    Sept 2009- Gabriola Radio will be deciding on the next course of action real soon. For sure AMARC will be advised.

    Rogers has made an offer to work together to see both applications go ahead. We want to work cooperatively with Rogers Media but time is running thin. Our proposed funding mechanism is time dependent and the Rogers delay may cause real harm to our efforts to establish a community station this upcoming year.

    On a positive note the NCRA has awarded Gabriola the hosting duties for the National Radio conference June of 2010. We see this as a chance to ensure a great conference, high light our concerns and show off the talent on Gabriola. Stay tuned and see you there.

    Ken Zakreski
    president
    Gabriola Radio Society

  4. Ken Zakreski

    For those following the
    For those following the ongoing efforts of Gabriola Radio to obtain a license to broadcast there has been a development.

    Rogers has filed an application (CRTC 2009-0996-3) to expand their 100,000 Watt CIOC 98.5 FM (The Ocean) with a repeater (max 3,500 watt) on Saltspring Island. Rogers has been noticed for a CRTC consultation Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2009-516. The link to file a comment is http://support.crtc.gc.ca/rapidscin/default.aspx?lang=en&applicant=2009-516

    Rogers states their reason is to improve service to their existing coverage area but their expansion of 98.5 FM will wipe out the last channel available for Gabriola Radio to use. The issue is the last channel going to a community applicant for a news service or a small amount of revenue for the largest media service in Canada. Rogers revenue projections state they will only make $100,000 in year three and $136,591 in year seven. Corporate greed over public interest.

    Gabriola Radio had applied to use 98.7 FM (60 watts) but Rogers objected even though their existing service was fully protected. Rogers technical objection was the reason the Gabriola application was withdrawn. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2009/2009-36-4.htm

    We are asking all concerned parties to file a CRTC intervention and OPPOSE the Rogers expansion. Should Rogers expansion be denied by the CRTC, Gabriola Radio will re-apply for use of 98.7 FM and, if approved, commence a much needed community service to Gabriola and surrounding area.

    Don’t let Gabriola drown in the Ocean – OPPOSE the Rogers expansion.

    Saltspring Island, British Columbia
    Application No. 2009-0996-3   Application by Rogers Broadcasting Limited to amend the broadcasting licence of the English-language commercial FM radio programming undertaking CIOC-FM Victoria, British Columbia.   The licensee proposes to add an FM transmitter at Saltspring Island, British Columbia to broadcast the programming of CIOC-FM Victoria, British Columbia in order to improve reception quality within the existing coverage area of CIOC-FM.   The transmitter would operate on frequency 98.5 MHz (channel 253C1) with an average effective radiated power (ERP) of 635 watts (maximum ERP of 3,500 watts with an effective height of antenna above average terrain of 662 metres).   This would be a synchronous repeater, using the same frequency as CIOC-FM.   The licensee states that a transmitter located on Saltspring Island would be the optimal solution to correcting the reception deficiencies of CIOC-FM to the north of its coverage area.   Licensee’s address:

    Rogers Broadcasting Limited
    333 Bloor Street East, 6th Floor
    Toronto, Ontario
    Fax: 416-935-8203
    E-mail: susan.wheeler@rci.rogers.com   Examination of application:

    817 Fort Street
    Victoria, British Columbia

    Access to application via the Internet
    Saltspring Island Public Library
    129 McPhillips Ave.
    Saltspring Island, British Columbia  
    Public Participation
     
    Deadline for Interventions/Comments
     
    29 September 2009
      The intervention must be received by the Commission and by the applicant on or before the above-mentioned date. The Commission cannot be held responsible for postal delays and will not notify a party whose intervention is received after the deadline date. The intervention will not be considered by the Commission and will not be part of the public file.   Interventions will be considered by the Commission and will form part of the public record of the proceeding without further notification to intervening parties, provided the procedure set out below has been followed. Parties will be contacted only if their submissions raise procedural questions.   Written interventions should be submitted to the Secretary General of the Commission in only one of the following formats:  
    by using the
[Broadcasting interventions/comments form]
     
    by mail to
CRTC, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N2
     
    or
     
    by fax at
819-994-0218
      A true copy must be sent to the applicant, and proof that this has been done must accompany the intervention sent to the Commission.   The Commission advises those who file and serve by electronic mode to exercise caution when using e-mail for service of documents or notification, as it may be difficult to establish that service has occurred.   Parties must ensure, before initiating service through electronic mode, that they will be able to satisfy the Commission, upon request, that service of the notification was completed.   Where the intervention is filed by electronic means, the line ***End of document*** should be entered following the last paragraph of the document, as an indication that the document has not been damaged during electronic transmission.   Each paragraph of the document should be numbered.   Interventions should clearly identify the application referred to and indicate whether parties support or oppose the application, or, if they propose changes to it, include the facts and grounds for their proposal.  

  5. Ken Zakreski

    The CRTC has denied Rogers
    The CRTC has denied Rogers Application to expand its CIOC Victoria Radio service.

    http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2010/2010-180.htm

    Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2010-180
    Route reference: 2009-516
    Ottawa, 25 March 2010
    Rogers Broadcasting Limited
    Victoria and Saltspring Island, British Columbia
    Application 2009-0996-3, received 7 July 2009

    CIOC-FM Victoria – New transmitter at Saltspring Island
    The Commission denies an application to amend the broadcasting licence for CIOC-FM Victoria in order to operate a transmitter at Saltspring Island.

  6. Ken Zakreski

    It took some time, but fine

    It took some time, but fine wine always does. Ken

    Fundraiser set for Jan 7th, 2012

    http://www.ckgi.ca/approval/

     

    Approval

    Ottawa, 2 November 2011

    Gabriola Radio Society
    Gabriola Island, British Columbia

    Application 2010-1554-5, received 14 October 2010
    Public hearing in the National Capital Region
    18 July 2011

    English-language community FM radio station in Gabriola Island

    The Commission approves an application for a broadcasting licence to operate an English-language community FM radio station in Gabriola Island, British Columbia.

     

    full decision http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-679.htm

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