With armchair art and theatre critics proliferating online, media cutbacks reducing the number of those who critique for a living, and celebrity news trumping cultural coverage, is the relevance of the traditional art and theatre critic less–or greater–than it once was? This discussion explores the Internet's impact on art criticism, and what it means for the arts and its audiences. Join Ben Brantley, chief theatre critic, The New York Times; Robert Cushman, theatre arts critic, The National Post; Peter Schjeldahl, arts critic, The New Yorker; and moderator Sara Angel, visual arts journalist and Trudeau Doctoral Scholar at the University of Toronto's Department of Art.

With armchair art and theatre critics proliferating online, media cutbacks reducing the number of those who critique for a living, and celebrity news trumping cultural coverage, is the relevance of the traditional art and theatre critic less–or greater–than it once was? This discussion explores the Internet's impact on art criticism, and what it means for the arts and its audiences. Join Ben Brantley, chief theatre critic, The New York Times; Robert Cushman, theatre arts critic, The National Post; Peter Schjeldahl, arts critic, The New Yorker; and moderator Sara Angel, visual arts journalist and Trudeau Doctoral Scholar at the University of Toronto's Department of Art.

 

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Tamara Baluja is an award-winning journalist with CBC Vancouver and the 2018 Michener-Deacon fellow for journalism education. She was the associate editor for J-Source from 2013-2014.