In its latest tussle with the CRTC,
broadcaster CTV has launched a multimedia fueled campaign à la
Greenpeace, complete with testimonials,
ads
and an online
petition
. What’s it all about? The feud between cable companies
and conventional broadcasters masks the fact that both industries are
headed for trouble, says Kelly Toughill in
Carriage fees are just the beginning
.

Muddying the waters with this earlier
Toughill post
, it seems CTV is still turning a healthy profit. Meanwhile, television viewer Fagstein blogs that
your friendly neighbourhood conglomerate hasn’t
done much for the neighbourhood lately
. As a viewer, he’ll get on
board if CTV opens its books to the public, revealing how much money
is being spent on American programming and executive salaries.

Yet more evidence of that ingrained Canadian tendency to take local heros with a grain of salt.


In its latest tussle with the CRTC,
broadcaster CTV has launched a multimedia fueled campaign à la
Greenpeace, complete with testimonials,
ads
and an online
petition
. What’s it all about? The feud between cable companies
and conventional broadcasters masks the fact that both industries are
headed for trouble, says Kelly Toughill in
Carriage fees are just the beginning
.

Muddying the waters with this earlier
Toughill post
, it seems CTV is still turning a healthy profit. Meanwhile, television viewer Fagstein blogs that
your friendly neighbourhood conglomerate hasn’t
done much for the neighbourhood lately
. As a viewer, he’ll get on
board if CTV opens its books to the public, revealing how much money
is being spent on American programming and executive salaries.

Yet more evidence of that ingrained Canadian tendency to take local heros with a grain of salt.

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Patricia W. Elliott is a magazine journalist and assistant professor at the School of Journalism, University of Regina. You can visit her at patriciaelliott.ca.