A few days ago, Eye Weekly publisher and editor-in-chief Laas Turnbull sent out this monumental tweet : “No more escort ads! That’s right: The Grid will be free of starburst-covered nipples and pixilated faces. Makes me feel kinda wistful.” While some readers will surely be happy to see the controversial ads go, we’re betting he’s not the only one who’s a little sad, as well.

A few days ago, Eye Weekly publisher and editor-in-chief Laas Turnbull
sent out this monumental tweet
: “No more escort ads! That’s right: The
Grid
will be free of starburst-covered nipples and pixilated faces.
Makes me feel kinda wistful.” While some readers will surely be happy to
see the controversial ads go, we’re betting he’s not the only one who’s
a little sad, as well.

Canadian Business reporter Jeff Beer caught up with Turnbull to discuss the move from crass to class.

Here’s what he said:

“Given what we’re producing editorially,which I think is really quite beautiful and innovative, I think it would be really incongruous to have those nasty looking things in the back of the book … What really drove it home for us was being contacted a few times by the police, asking for our help because they found out that a 14, 15 or 16-year-old girl was abducted and they suspect that she had been inducted into some prostitution ring. That’s the part of it I find really unacceptable.”

While Turnbull does say the ads are mega profitable, he adds that they just don’t fit into the brand’s new incarnation. Besides it won’t be a total revenue walk-away: It’s likely some national advertisers, who were previously turned-off by the oft-lewd ads, will be more willing to align themselves with The Grid‘s escort-free pages.

The Grid will launch May 12.

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