News
Parliament should repeal the Canadian Human Rights Commission’s power to investigate online hate messages, leaving such probes to police, prosecutors and Internet service providers, says a report released in November 2008. “Censorship of hate speech should be limited to speech that explicitly or implicitly threatens, justifies or advocates violence against the members of an identifiable group,” says Richard Moon, a constitutional law expert the commission hired to explore whether its mandate threatens freedom of speech.
Read the Canwest News Service report.
Read Richard Moon’s report to the commission.
The Canadian Association of Journalists is urging the federal government to repeal Section 13 of the Canadian Human Rights Commission Act, which grants the agency the power to police the Internet and censor speech.

News
Parliament should repeal the Canadian Human Rights Commission’s power to investigate online hate messages, leaving such probes to police, prosecutors and Internet service providers, says a report released in November 2008. “Censorship of hate speech should be limited to speech that explicitly or implicitly threatens, justifies or advocates violence against the members of an identifiable group,” says Richard Moon, a constitutional law expert the commission hired to explore whether its mandate threatens freedom of speech.
Read the Canwest News Service report.
Read Richard Moon’s report to the commission.
The Canadian Association of Journalists is urging the federal government to repeal Section 13 of the Canadian Human Rights Commission Act, which grants the agency the power to police the Internet and censor speech.

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