“Phones were hacked, and for that this newspaper is truly sorry.” But sorry for not much else, according to the News of the World’s farewell missive, which concluded, “We hope history will eventually judge us on all our years.” Over 168 years, there’s no doubt the News cracked open some big stories. The tabloid that saw no shame in buying sources (with suggested prices on their website) ended its run in the ignominy of its own scandal. The question is: Who will mourn? Certainly not George Michael, to name one relieved celebrity. Hopping mad shareholders include the Church of England, which has called on Rupert Murdoch to launch a full investigation. Editor Rebekah Brooks spent her final working hours combing the last edition for hidden messages from outraged staffers – but she missed the cryptic crossword. Today the paper's extensive website disappeared, except for an online purchase form for a souvenir edition. Thus ends “the newspaper that died of shame,” raising the question of what happens next for British tabs. 


“Phones were hacked, and for that this newspaper is truly sorry.” But sorry for not much else, according to the News of the World’s farewell missive, which concluded, “We hope history will eventually judge us on all our years.” Over 168 years, there’s no doubt the News cracked open some big stories. The tabloid that saw no shame in buying sources (with suggested prices on their website) ended its run in the ignominy of its own scandal. The question is: Who will mourn? Certainly not George Michael, to name one relieved celebrity. Hopping mad shareholders include the Church of England, which has called on Rupert Murdoch to launch a full investigation. Editor Rebekah Brooks spent her final working hours combing the last edition for hidden messages from outraged staffers – but she missed the cryptic crossword. Today the paper's extensive website disappeared, except for an online purchase form for a souvenir edition. Thus ends “the newspaper that died of shame,” raising the question of what happens next for British tabs. 

Patricia W. Elliott is a magazine journalist and assistant professor at the School of Journalism, University of Regina. You can visit her at patriciaelliott.ca.