This week’s edition of L’Express International was banned by Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco for having “offended Islam.”

Associated Press quoted an anonymous official who said Algeria banned the magazine because it published “illustrations or accounts … contrary to Islamic morality or national values.” In Tunisia an anonymous official said it could be considered to be “offensive to Islam and faith or convictions of Mulsims.”

Ironically, the subject that so offended the religious censors was part of the coverage of an unprecedented three-day Catholic-Muslim summit in Rome that aims to “help the dialogue between Islam and Christianity.”

This week’s edition of L’Express International was banned by Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco for having “offended Islam.”

Associated Press quoted an anonymous official who said Algeria banned the magazine because it published “illustrations or accounts … contrary to Islamic morality or national values.” In Tunisia an anonymous official said it could be considered to be “offensive to Islam and faith or convictions of Mulsims.”

Ironically, the subject that so offended the religious censors was part of the coverage of an unprecedented three-day Catholic-Muslim summit in Rome that aims to “help the dialogue between Islam and Christianity.”