If you struggle to explain to students when it is appropriate to use “says” vs. “said” in their stories, you may find some guidance from these editors and writers. In this piece, the Poynter Institute’s Chip Scanlan, explains why feature writers generally prefer the present tense, while some editors detest it. He makes his case, then follows up with the different views of the four newspaper editors.

If you struggle to explain to students when it is appropriate to use “says” vs. “said” in their stories, you may find some guidance from these editors and writers. In this piece, the Poynter Institute’s Chip Scanlan, explains why feature writers generally prefer the present tense, while some editors detest it. He makes his case, then follows up with the different views of the four newspaper editors.

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