Back in February, media watcher Robert Hackett argued media reform
should be a top priority
in the impending (even back then) federal
election. Hackett saw a disturbing constellation forming: an industry push for
deregulation, a new market-friendly CRTC head, and a government bent on
pursuing a majority.

But between collapsing markets and pooping puffins,
only a few carried the flag for media reform. The Campaign for Democratic Media posted this
questionnaire
for candidates on their web site. While there may not be
enough time left to quiz your local hopefuls, the list doubles as a handy
point-form summary of the issues, from CBC funding to U.S. ownership. On a
national level, the Campaign received answers from all but one party. The results are
contained in this
report
. Amid mildly interesting responses, the silence of Harper’s
Conservatives perhaps speaks the loudest.  

Back in February, media watcher Robert Hackett argued media reform
should be a top priority
in the impending (even back then) federal
election. Hackett saw a disturbing constellation forming: an industry push for
deregulation, a new market-friendly CRTC head, and a government bent on
pursuing a majority.

But between collapsing markets and pooping puffins,
only a few carried the flag for media reform. The Campaign for Democratic Media posted this
questionnaire
for candidates on their web site. While there may not be
enough time left to quiz your local hopefuls, the list doubles as a handy
point-form summary of the issues, from CBC funding to U.S. ownership. On a
national level, the Campaign received answers from all but one party. The results are
contained in this
report
. Amid mildly interesting responses, the silence of Harper’s
Conservatives perhaps speaks the loudest.  

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Patricia W. Elliott is a magazine journalist and assistant professor at the School of Journalism, University of Regina. You can visit her at patriciaelliott.ca.