The future of news — we bet you've heard that phrase a lot. With so many cool, new things happening in the journo world it can be hard to keep up with all the innovative — and constantly evolving — ways to tell stories. That's why J-Source is doing it for you. Each week, we'll feature a new idea on the block, whether it's a tool, or a new way to use that tool, or just a super sweet way to tell the story — this is our ode to the digital world. Up this week: ScribbleLive's newest feature LiveArticle.

The future of news — we bet you've heard that phrase a lot. With so many cool, new things happening in the journo world it can be hard to keep up with all the innovative — and constantly evolving — ways to tell stories. That's why J-Source is doing it for you. Each week, we'll feature a new idea on the block, whether it's a tool, or a new way to use that tool, or just a super sweet way to tell the story — this is our ode to the digital world. Up this week: ScribbleLive's newest feature LiveArticle.

LiveArticle is Toronto-based ScribbleLive's new take on the liveblog. Call it, as Scribble did, the "next incarnation of live coverage."

Here's the basic premise: While plenty of newsrooms have used liveblogging to cover an event as-it-happens, many still write a post-event wrap-up the day after. But what if you didn't have to? What if, instead, you could do it all at once? And what if you could also invite your audience — and other staff — to participate in mass coverage goodness? Well, that's kind of how LiveArticle works.

Take the Toronto Star. They recently used LiveArticle to provide coverage of the GTA's mega heatwave. There is a standard article, with photo, pinned to the top of the coverage. But there's also updates on heat alerts, and content on just about everything else heat-related. Interwoven into the piece are tweets, and photos from both staff and readers. Keep scrolling down and you'll find a mix of related Star articles, factoids, photos, more tweets, live blog posts, and videos.

The Province also used the new feature recently to cover a Vancouver Police Board meeting on the Stanley Cup riot — but the effect is not quite so info-laden.

Outside of Canada, KOAT (channel 7) used LiveArticle to cover the Las Conchas Fire, which, at 130,691 acres, is New Mexico's largest fire ever. A story and video on the fire are tacked to the top of each page, but below are dozens and dozens  — OK about 129 pages — of tweets, photos and updates.

Intrigued? You can check out ScribbleLive's sell here, or watch the how-to video below.

And, while you're at it, send us links to what you think is making "the future of news".

 

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