“Whatever happened to Iraq,” an analysis in the American Journalism Review, examines what it calls a “dramatic dropoff” in media coverage of the Iraq war.

Among the main reasons cited in the piece: the enormous danger for journalists on the ground in Iraq; war fatigue; efforts to “sanitize” the war by the Bush administration; plunging newsroom budgets and shrinking news space; competing megastories on the home front like the presidential primaries and the sagging economy figure into the equation, and the exorbitant cost of keeping correspondents in Baghdad.


“Whatever happened to Iraq,” an analysis in the American Journalism Review, examines what it calls a “dramatic dropoff” in media coverage of the Iraq war.

Among the main reasons cited in the piece: the enormous danger for journalists on the ground in Iraq; war fatigue; efforts to “sanitize” the war by the Bush administration; plunging newsroom budgets and shrinking news space; competing megastories on the home front like the presidential primaries and the sagging economy figure into the equation, and the exorbitant cost of keeping correspondents in Baghdad.

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