Commentary
Britain’s libel laws are outdated and a gift to the censorious and powerful, who use them to silence critics and, increasingly, to try to shut down websites and bloggers. The Internet and the global nature of publishing ensure “these medieval laws have become the most powerful extra-territorial legislation ever drafted.” Author George Monboit, writing in The Guardian, says timid British politicians and compliant British journalists are to blame, but fears he’d be sued if he dared to name names.

Commentary
Britain’s libel laws are outdated and a gift to the censorious and powerful, who use them to silence critics and, increasingly, to try to shut down websites and bloggers. The Internet and the global nature of publishing ensure “these medieval laws have become the most powerful extra-territorial legislation ever drafted.” Author George Monboit, writing in The Guardian, says timid British politicians and compliant British journalists are to blame, but fears he’d be sued if he dared to name names.

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