CBS correspondent Lara Logan’s sexual assault in February brought the issue of sexual violence and journalists into sharp focus, writes CPJ’s senior editor Lauren Wolfe. It has also encouraged more journalists worldwide to start speaking out.

CBS correspondent Lara Logan’s sexual assault in February brought the issue of sexual violence and journalists into sharp focus, writes CPJ’s senior editor Lauren Wolfe. It has also encouraged more journalists worldwide to start speaking out.

Over the past four months the Committee to Protect Journalists has interviewed more than four dozen journalists who have experienced sexual violence, from rape to aggressive groping. Journalists said the incidents were either in retaliation for their work, or happened during the course of their reporting.

Those interviewed include 27 local journalists, from top editors to beat reporters, men and women, spanning the globe from the Middle East, to South Asia, Africa, and the Americas, and 25 international journalists. Most of the attacks occurred within the past five years.

Many who spoke to the CPJ had not publicly discussed their experiences beyond friends and family. Reasons for the silence included fear of cultural stigmas, lack of faith in authorities, but also fear that their editors, if they found out, would perceive them as vulnerable and deny them future assignments.

You can read the full report at the CPJ website

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