In the run-up to the Beijing Olympics, the Foreign Correspondents Club of China is
keeping a “reporting interference tally” on their Web site. Meanwhile, journalists
scored a small victory this week when China agreed to the partial
unblocking of several Web sites, including the Reporters Without
Borders
site. But in a public statement the FCCC said their organization “remains
concerned that access is inconsistent and many internet sites remain off
limits.” Can China
be expected to accept across-the-board Internet freedom, or is this as good as
it gets for now? Below are a few of the sites that remain blocked.     

(Reporters Without Borders logo)

In the run-up to the Beijing Olympics, the Foreign Correspondents Club of China is
keeping a “reporting interference tally” on their Web site. Meanwhile, journalists
scored a small victory this week when China agreed to the partial
unblocking of several Web sites, including the Reporters Without
Borders
site. But in a public statement the FCCC said their organization “remains
concerned that access is inconsistent and many internet sites remain off
limits.” Can China
be expected to accept across-the-board Internet freedom, or is this as good as
it gets for now? Below are a few of the sites that remain blocked.     

(Reporters Without Borders logo)

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Patricia W. Elliott is a magazine journalist and assistant professor at the School of Journalism, University of Regina. You can visit her at patriciaelliott.ca.