With the spotlight on the detention of Laura Ling and Euna Lee in North Korea, we are reminded of the dangers confronting young journalists working abroad for new media. As many traditional news organizations reduce their foreign coverage, some alternative ones are rushing in. For eager young journalists with little or no safety training and few supporting resources, the dangers are substantial. Brian Stelter, writing in The New York Times, analyses what he calls this “improvised, headlong journalism.”


With the spotlight on the detention of Laura Ling and Euna Lee in North Korea, we are reminded of the dangers confronting young journalists working abroad for new media. As many traditional news organizations reduce their foreign coverage, some alternative ones are rushing in. For eager young journalists with little or no safety training and few supporting resources, the dangers are substantial. Brian Stelter, writing in The New York Times, analyses what he calls this “improvised, headlong journalism.”

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