The European Journalism Centre has a nice spotlight article on a new start-up called Investigative Dashboard. The ID, as its creators like to call it, is a multi-tasking website that offers loads of resources for investigative journalists worldwide. Not only does the site function as an aggregation platform for many journo tools, it also facilitates research projects for journalists who don’t have the time, money, or resources to complete work abroad.

The European Journalism Centre has a nice spotlight article on a new start-up called Investigative Dashboard. The ID, as its creators like to call it, is a multi-tasking website that offers loads of resources for investigative journalists worldwide. Not only does the site function as an aggregation platform for many journo tools, it also facilitates research projects for journalists who don’t have the time, money, or resources to complete work abroad.

The initiative is spearheaded by the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, the Romanian Center for Investigative Journalism, the Forum for African Investigative Reporters and the International Center for Journalists. It is currently co-ordinated by Paul Radu and Justin Arenstein, two Standford University Knight Fellows who developed the idea together while in residence.

In an interview discussing the prestigious Stanford University fellowship, Radu said the idea came to him while covering organized crime and corruption in the Balkans. There is a certain point, he said, where journalists there hit an information wall. ID is meant to help them break it down.

It’s also meant to help what Radu calls the global investigative journalist community — Canadians included. “This would be a one stop shop for investigative journalists,” he said in the interview, “All the tools they need to follow money across borders.”

Check out the tutorial video below, and, of course, the site itself.

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