The average Internet-connected Canadian spends about 2.3 hours a day consuming news and information from a variety of sources, including television and newspapers, according to a new study by the Canadian Media Research Consortium (pdf) based on 1,000 interviews. Asked about “top-of-mind” stories, most respondents reported first learning about them on television. But most who wanted to know sought additional information online. The study also found that while older respondents tended to read text online, younger people preferred online video. The study notes that while television and newspapers continue to be used as news sources, the strengths of these traditional media (newspapers are seen as strong on detail, background and context while television is seen as strong on visuals and live reports) are increasingly also found online.

The average Internet-connected Canadian spends about 2.3 hours a day consuming news and information from a variety of sources, including television and newspapers, according to a new study by the Canadian Media Research Consortium (pdf) based on 1,000 interviews. Asked about “top-of-mind” stories, most respondents reported first learning about them on television. But most who wanted to know sought additional information online. The study also found that while older respondents tended to read text online, younger people preferred online video. The study notes that while television and newspapers continue to be used as news sources, the strengths of these traditional media (newspapers are seen as strong on detail, background and context while television is seen as strong on visuals and live reports) are increasingly also found online.

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