She called herself a journalist; her critics called her a propagandist. She was vilified as a nutcase, a drunk, a fraud, a Taliban-lover, even a traitor. Nevertheless, Beverley Giesbrecht did something few Canadians dared to do–to venture into Pakistan’s tribal regions with a video camera, looking for the “truth” about the jihadist insurgency. And she died under the most wretched circumstances. Her story, by freelancer Claude Adams.

She called herself a journalist; her critics called her a propagandist. She was vilified as a nutcase, a drunk, a fraud, a Taliban-lover, even a traitor. Nevertheless, Beverley Giesbrecht did something few Canadians dared to do–to venture into Pakistan’s tribal regions with a video camera, looking for the “truth” about the jihadist insurgency. And she died under the most wretched circumstances. Her story, by freelancer Claude Adams.

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