News about the news for the week of April 21.

Welcome to Tuesday Tabs, a roundup of headlines at home, down south and elsewhere.

Canada

With the dismissal of the last of the lawsuits launched against him, John Furlong’s nightmare is over, writes The Tyee’s Paul Willcocks. But what about the former students whose affidavits launched the whole process?

As of last week, CBC’s Q is no longer Q; its now q. Or is it still Q? Who knows?

Related: CBC Radio producer Andrew Kurjata has a blog post up about the public broadcaster’s latest round of job cuts last week. 

It’s been two years since the launch of La Presse +. President and publisher Guy Crevier writes (in French) about the milestones the Quebec newspapers free tablet edition has hit since then.

 

U.S.

A study at the University of Kansas finds that journalism burnout affects women more than men.

On the rise of the non-profit news organization model in the States—and the funding models that are working for them.

After a few months of speculation, it looks as though a content-hosting partnership between Facebook and the New York Times will go ahead.

Remember the chilling citizen-recorded video of a North Charleston police officer shooting an unarmed Walter Scott in the back? Apparently that citizen, Feidin Santana, has now hired a publicist to help him charge news outlets for the right to publish the recording.

 

International

Two U.K. journalists have launched Parly, a crowd-funded news app that promised to put parliament in your pocket during that country’s upcoming general election.

In the nine months that Washington Post Tehran correspondent Jason Rezaian has been imprisoned on unstated charges, he is allowed meet with his lawyer once before trial—and hasnt yet been given that meeting.

Can journalism be weaponized? A congressional hearing on Russias use of information and pseudo-journalism convened last week in Washington to answer this question.

The Times of London may charge readers for online access, but the papers developers believe in open-source news technologies.

Illustration photo by Tirza, via Flickr.