Young people want in-depth news reporting but can’t seem to find it in the daily torrent of headlines, news bits and factoids that bombard them in today’s 24/7, Internet-driven news environment, according to an ethnographic study of young people’s news habits commissioned by the Associated Press and released this week. The study, a preview of which was reported earlier in Findings, also suggests the difficulty younger news consumers face in following news is intensified by a habit of multitasking. Following a story beyond a headline or snippet happens almost by accident, depending on whether the user stumbles on a useful and attractive link or reference. The study recommends journalists be more aware of how Internet users consume news and and create more entry points to guide news consumers toward informative and contextualized reports.

Young people want in-depth news reporting but can’t seem to find it in the daily torrent of headlines, news bits and factoids that bombard them in today’s 24/7, Internet-driven news environment, according to an ethnographic study of young people’s news habits commissioned by the Associated Press and released this week. The study, a preview of which was reported earlier in Findings, also suggests the difficulty younger news consumers face in following news is intensified by a habit of multitasking. Following a story beyond a headline or snippet happens almost by accident, depending on whether the user stumbles on a useful and attractive link or reference. The study recommends journalists be more aware of how Internet users consume news and and create more entry points to guide news consumers toward informative and contextualized reports.

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